BSF Study Questions Matthew Lesson 5, Day 5: Matthew 5:13-16

Summary of passage:  Jesus tells his disciples (and all those people on the mountainside as well as you and me) that they are the salt of the earth but if you lose your saltiness you are no longer good for anything and will be thrown out and trampled by men.

You (believers) are the light of the world meant to be seen by others.  So let your good deeds shine so that others may praise the Father in heaven.

Questions:

9a)  In ancient times, salt was used to preserve meat and add flavor.  It was one of the valued “spices” in the spice trade along with many others that prompted the discovery of America.  It was a valuable and precious commodity of which men risked their lives for.

b)  Personal Question.  My answer:  As disciples of Christ, we should preserve God’s word and His teachings in the hearts and minds of others.  We should add flavor to others lives by giving them something (God) that is valuable.

c)  Personal Question.  My answer:  Not sure.  Not feeling very upbeat this morning or useful so tend to feel I haven’t made as much an impact as I could.

d)  Personal Question.  My answer:  I interpret this question to really ask in plain English the difference between living amongst Christians and living in a non-Christian environment.  Or it could be interpreted as what’s it like living when you have lost your flavor, meaning your usefulness in this realm.

For the former, we all can answer that due to the ungodly society we live in day-in and day-out. It’s an easy life amongst Christians, not so easy amongst others who are bent on tearing us down and trampling us.

For the latter, if the flavor of Christ is missing, you lead a tasteless life.  Non-impactful.  Dull. Blah.

I don’t think BSF meant the latter interpretation because it says you are living as salt, which is a shame since the passage addresses what happens when we lose our saltiness.

Christians can lead a flavorless life when they stop living an impactful life and spreading the word.

10a)  Light illuminates the dark and also pushes the dark back.  It also exposes what is in the dark.

b)  To be the light of the world.  To bring others the light of Jesus and to bring them out of the dark.  The Matthew passage says it better so I’m unsure why we were sent to Luke’s account of these words.  We are to let our light shine before men so that they may see our good deeds and be brought to Jesus and glorify God.

11)  God must work in you His good purpose so that you may become blameless and pure, children of God without fault as we hold onto the word of life (God’s word).

12a)  Repeat of 10b.  We are to let our light shine before men so that they may see our good deeds and be brought to Jesus and glorify God.  So others may see grace in us and thus grace in God.  We are lead visible and intentional lives for all to see.

b)  Personal Question.  My answer:  Not to hide Him.  To credit Him in public for everything in my life.  To say more often how it is all God’s grace and will working in me.  To pray that I am a light to others.  That I be cognizant of that.  That I remember I’m His.  And that I remember others are watching and judging me all the time and one never knows when I could convert someone.

Conclusions:  I felt the boat was missed on this lesson.  9d did nothing more than confuse people.  BSF took the metaphor too far in my opinion.  Did not like being sent to Luke.  As I mentioned in Lesson 1, I foresaw this as a pattern that we’d be studying the other gospels alongside Matthew since the stories are frequently repeated and I accepted this.  However, in this case, Luke wasn’t helpful.  I feel Matthew’s version is much meatier and I feel we didn’t touch on the “city on the hill” at all.  This is such a common quote amongst Christians (and non-Christians for that matter) that I felt we should have unpacked it and explained it so that we can understand it.

To me, “city on a hill” is Core Knowledge (yes, this is a throw out to you homeschoolers and educators out there), something everyone should know especially since it has been secularized and it’s meaning stripped (meaning Jesus has been taken out and man has been substituted).  And it was overlooked, bypassed if you will, for metaphors on salt.  Too many questions on salt.  Not enough on light (which is EVERYWHERE in the Bible) and a much more important study than salt.

For instance, did you know Jesus called himself “the light of the world” (John 8:12, John 9:5) as well and now he calls us that too!  Pretty cool!  I’m pretty humbled by it to be honest.  To be compared to Jesus!  Wow!  Makes my day.  It is both a compliment and a commission. Unmentioned by BSF.

Fun Fact:  This is the first time in the New Testament God is referred to as Father.