BSF Study Questions Romans Lesson 14, Day 2: Romans 8:17-18

Summary of passage:  Since we are God’s children, we are heirs of God and Christ and share in his sufferings and glory.  Our sufferings are miniscule compared to the glory that awaits us.

Questions:

3)  Part personal Question.  My answer:  Paul suffered terribly as we all know.  He was imprisoned and murdered by the Romans.  He was tortured and beaten, robbed and stoned.  He was scared for his earthly life most of the time and on the run from persecutors.  He was shipwrecked and starving.  This does not affect my understanding of these verses in any measurable way.  When I suffer, it’s nothing compared to Paul or any other 1st century human.  It’s hard to compare apples to oranges.  All I know is my suffering is miniscule to Paul’s and I try not to complain about it.

That being said disregarding Paul who lived 2000 years ago, Paul’s words are encouraging because in my suffering there is hope and a glory that is unseen.  Suffering is fleeting; glory is forever.  And when you think you have nothing you really have everything.

4a)  The definition of glory according to Webster’s Dictionary is “praise, honor, or distinction extended by common consent: renown.  worshipful praise, honor and thanksgiving.  great beauty and splendor; magnificence.”  According to Zondervan’s Illustrated Bible Dictionary, glory is “Great honor or praise; used especially of God’s majestic splendor; weight, burden, wealth, magnificence, honor.  The glory of God is the worthiness of God or the presence of God in the fullness of his attributes in some place or everywhere.”

b)  2 Corinthians 3:18:  “We all reflect the Lord’s glory and are being transformed into his likeness with ever-increasing glory, which comes from the Lord, who is the Spirit.”

Philippians 3:20-21:  Our bodies will be transformed into Jesus’s glorious body.

Colossians 1:27:  Christ in us is the hope of glory and a glorious mystery.

2 Thessalonians 2:13-14:  We were called and chosen by God to share in Christ’s glory.

Hebrews 2:10:  Jesus brought us to glory through his suffering and death. (read Hebrews 2:9)

5)  Part personal Question.  My answer:  Suffering and glory go hand in hand.  You can’t have one without the other.  Christ suffered; we suffer.  Christ has glory; we have glory.  You have to suffer in order to have glory.  Suffering is a part of life.  It’s something we have to walk through.  It doesn’t last forever–heaven and Jesus are forever.  In heaven, our glory will shine.  Keeping a heavenly perspective through suffering and keeping faith in Christ gives us/me hope during the trials and tribulations of life and will go a long way towards us getting through suffering here on this side of heaven.  Glory outshines the suffering.

Conclusions:  Every question is outside of this passage.

End Notes:  Our sharing in Christ’s suffering is a condition of our future glorification.

Without a heavenly hope, Paul considered the Christian life foolish and tragic (1 Corinthians 15:19). Yet in light of eternity it is the wisest and best choice anyone can make.

This coming glory will not only be revealed to us, but it will actually be revealed in us.

God has put this glory into the believer right now. In heaven the glory will simply be revealed.

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BSF Study Questions Revelation Lesson 19, Day 3: Revelation 14:6-13

Summary of passage:  John sees 3 angels.  The first proclaims the eternal gospel to the earth and says to turn to God because the judgment has come.  The second says how Babylon has fallen.  The third warns that whoever worships the beast or bears his mark will have God’s fury, be tormented with burning sulfur, and have no rest.  God says blessed are the dead who die in the Lord.

Questions:

6a)  First angel:  The eternal gospel, saying to turn to God now and worship Him because judgment has come.

Second angel:  Babylon has fallen.

Third angel:  Whoever worships the beast or bears his mark will have God’s fury, be tormented with burning sulfur, and have no rest–a judgment upon men’s souls.

b)  “Those who live on earth–to every nation, tribe, language, and people.”

7)  That Jesus is God’s son and only belief and faith in him as the Savior will result in forgiveness of sins and eternal life.  1 Corinthians 15 lays it out:  the saving gospel is :  Christ died for our sins, he was buried, he rose on the 3rd day.  His blood set us free forever and justified us–all through grace (1 Corinthians 15:10). (Read 1 Corinthians 15:1-2 as well for use of the word “gospel”).

Note:  The first angel is preaching the gospel (turn to Jesus and be saved) AND announcing the coming judgment.  He is announcing the “good news” that God’s words will be consummated–judgment is here, Satan will be vanquished, Israel shall be saved, and Christ shall come again!

8 )  Part personal Question.  My answer:  Matthew says to go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, son, and Holy Spirit and teaching them to obey all of God’s commands.  2 Corinthians says to preach Jesus as Lord and let our light (knowledge of God and Christ) shine out to the darkness (unbelievers).  1 Peter says to declare the praises of God who called us out of the darkness into the light.  God says we are a chosen people, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, belonging to Him, and Jesus says he will be with us always to the end of time.

In essence, we are called to do what the angels are doing here:  Proclaiming God’s greatness, power, glory, and grace and what happens to those who fight against Him.  Good connection.

We’ve had similar questions before:  Lesson 7 Day 2, Lesson 13 Day 5, and Lesson 15 Day 4

I am wondering how you answer this question if you are not a believer.  It seems if you’re not a believer, BSF is saying to skip this question.  Strange.

Conclusions:  Has anyone else noticed that there has been no challenge questions in this study?  I believe these are forever gone now and instead BSF provides us with the Scripture for the answers.  Any thoughts on this? It’s good for new believers I think.  I remember my first year doing Isaiah and I’d have no clue where to go for the challenge questions because I didn’t know the Bible.  On question 7 which normally would have been a challenge question I just knew the answer without having to look it up.

I think it’s a good thing.  Most of us don’t know where God’s word says eternal truths and having the Scriptures in front of us helps us to know and learn and memorize where God speaks to us.  It helps us in our daily life, in evangelizing, and in our daily battles with Satan since God’s word is a weapon.  Any other thoughts?

Clarification:  Note I am speaking of challenge questions only that pertain to the passage.  I’m not speaking of random questions that are on different topics that take us all over the Bible (see YESTERDAY’S conclusion for my opinions there).

End Notes:

THE FIRST ANGEL:  The peoples of the earth can either voluntarily give God glory and be saved or they will either one day be forced to give God glory (Philippians 2:9-11) and be damned.  Seems intuitive to me.

This gospel is called “eternal gospel.”  It is the same gospel as we know it (accept Jesus as Lord and Savior or be damned) but it’s preached during a specific time (Great Tribulation) and with more of an urgency (this is the people’s last chance to choose God).

Note:  This is the only place in the New Testament where we see angels preaching the gospel.  God has chosen man and given him the job/responsibility to spread the word of Jesus to all (Question 8)–a responsibility we need to take seriously and keep in the forefront of our minds at all time.

THE SECOND ANGEL:  

Babylon:  Babylon was the first of the 4 beasts in Daniel 7.  We will see Babylon again in Revelation 17.  “Babylon the Great” is taken from Daniel 4:30.  All first century Jews/Christians would know who Babylon was and what they did to God’s people.  It was the center of a world empire, noted for its luxury and moral decadence.

Some say Babylon here stands for Rome since Rome was the center of pagan worship during John’s time and the angel here is predicting the downfall of the Roman Empire (known as prophetic certainty).  Scholars point out in prophetic writings of the time “Babylon” was the code word used to refer to Rome.  Some say it represents rebellious people.  Others take it literally–Babylon that is rebuilt and restored.  The interpretation that make sense to me is that Babylon the Great stands for man’s ungodly political systems and governments that man has created.  It is an evil that opposed God.  Some scholars extend this to say it is Babylon the Great versus the New Jerusalem.

[Side Note: Babylon did NOT represent the Catholic Church which was the belief perpetuated in the nineteenth century with the rise of Protestantism.  Catholicism wasn’t even organized until the 300 AD’s–200 years after the book of Revelation has been composed.]

Whichever you believe, John chooses it to represent the evil in this world and in man’s heart.  Most likely this is spiritual adultery (worshiping of false gods) caused by Babylon but with spiritual adultery comes physical as well.  The repetition of fallen is to emphasis that Babylon is about to receive judgment.

THE THIRD ANGEL:  Receiving the mark of the beast is a choice that one makes.  It’s a choice that leads to God’s wrath.  Like worshiping pagan gods in God’s mind.

God’s cup of wrath is mentioned 13 times in the Bible (Psalm 60:3; 75:8; Isaiah 51:17; 63:6; Jeremiah 25:15-16; 51:7).  This is the cup Jesus drank for us (Matthew 26:39).  Here, those who don’t accept Jesus will be forced to drink it.

Note the wine is “full strength.”  In Ancient Times, everyone including children drank wine because the water was unsafe to drink.  However, it was always diluted or watered down.  Here, the unbelievers will not face any watered-down version of God’s wrath.  It will be full strength God!

The Greek word for wrath (thymos) is used here and 9 more times in the book of Revelation.  It is only used once elsewhere in the Bible.  It means passionate wrath.  A different anger (orge) which means settled indignation is most often used in the New Testament.

Note the torment of burning sulfur.  God burned Sodom and Gomorrah the same way.

Note how angels and God and Jesus will be present in hell.  It’s wrong to think otherwise.  They are there to oversee judgment–all love will be absent.

“For ever and ever” is the strongest Greek word for eternity and ages.  Torment will be everlasting.  I’d rather have life myself.  I fervently wish more churches would speak on this and more people would dwell on it.  I think in today’s society people think nothing of hell and thus have no idea of what they are facing as unbelievers.  If more people would ponder hell, we might have more investigating the greatness of God, the one who can save from such torture.

Note the present tense here.  People worship the beast continually and they will continually be tormented as just punishment.

God encourages the saints (those who accept Christ during the Great Tribulation) to be steadfast during the judgments and remain faithful even if they face death and their deeds will be remembered in heaven.  Same goes for us–our deeds will follow us to heaven.  What we do here matters.

Second Beatitude in Revelation:  “Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord from now on.”

Fun Fact:  This is the first of only 2 times the Holy Spirit speaks directly in the book of Revelation.