BSF Study Questions Romans Lesson 19, Day 4: Romans 11:11-24

Summary of passage:  Salvation has come to the Gentiles to make Israel jealous.  Israel can still be saved.  Israel’s unbelief has paved the way for the Gentiles.  However, Israel can still come to faith and the Gentiles must not boast over their salvation because they too can still fall.  Therefore, be kind for God can still cut off the Gentiles.

Questions:

8 )  Paul says because the Israelites have stumbled in their belief that Jesus is the Messiah, God has granted this opportunity to come to Him to the Gentiles in the hopes it will make Israel jealous and more Israelites will come to faith in Christ.  The good is that now all have been invited to sit at the hand of God through His Son, Jesus.  Before, only the Jews were chosen to receive God’s Word.  Now all may come.

9)  Paul is warning the Gentiles to not boast over their inclusion in God’s plan and over their faith and the Jews’ unbelief for God (being God) can cut off the Gentiles like He did the Jews.  In essence, Paul is warning don’t boast and instead be grateful and humble over your inclusion.

10)  Personal Question.  My answer:  Kindness is all of my blessings.  Sternness is when my blessings are taken from me temporary in order to grow, which in the end is a kindness as well.  The results are I have grown as a person and become more Christ-like and less me-like as I realize all things are from God.  It is all about Him.  I am more grateful than ever.

Conclusions:  It’s taken me up to this lesson to realize every day now has a personal question.  Love the grafting analogy and it would have been crystal-clear to the farmers of first century AD.  They would immediately have understood Paul’s point of bringing in the Gentiles at the expense and support of the Jews.

End Notes:  Israel stumbled, but did not fall.  They are still in God’s plan!  The Gospel only went out to the Gentiles after the Jews rejected it (Acts 13:4618:5-628:25-28).  Israel’s stumble was riches for the Gentiles for it gave them more opportunity to hear the Gospel.  The Gentiles were supposed to show the Jews how awesome a Christian life was, make them jealous, and have more come to Christ.  Instead, throughout history, they have more often than not persecuted the Jews for their beliefs when it fact it was because of the Jews that they themselves enjoyed salvation.

Part of the dough made from the first of the harvested grain (firstfruits) was offered to the Lord (Numbers 15:17-21).  This consecrated the whole batch (the Jewish people). Not all the Jews are righteous (i.e. saved) but that God will be true to his promises concerning them.  Paul saw a future for Israel.

Roots–patriarchs

Branches–Jewish people.

The salvation of Gentile Christians is dependent on the Jews.

Some commentators see the firstfruits as the first Christians, who were Jewish. Their conversion was something holy and good for the church. After all, each of the apostles and most of the human authors of Scripture were Jewish. If the conversion of this firstfruit was good for the Gentiles, how much better will it be when the complete harvest is brought in!  However, many commentators take the firstfruit here as the patriarchs.

Botanists and orchard growers commonly use grafting to improve their stock of flowers and fruit.  Usually they graft a weaker, cultivated branch onto a wild but sturdy root stock.  Paul admits that, contrary to nature, God has grafted the wild branches (Gentiles) onto the cultivated roots (Jews)–a reverse technique sometimes used to reinvigorate an olive tree.

It is only by God’s grace that they can be grafted into the “tree” of God – the “root” of which is Israel.

Paul reminds the Gentiles that the root supports the branches – not the other way around.  Any Gentile standing in the “tree” of God is there by faith only, not by works or merits. If Gentiles are unbelieving, they will be “cut off” just as much as unbelieving Israel was.

Any adequate doctrine of God must include both kindness and sternness.  When we ignore his kindness, God seems a ruthless tyrant.  When we ignore his sternness, God seems a doting father.

We must continually abide in God’s goodness (also expressed in John 15:1-8.)  Paul warns of pride.  The Jews are not cut off permanently. There is hope for all.

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BSF Study Questions Romans Lesson 19, Day 3: Romans 11:1-10

Summary of passage:  God did not reject His people.  They have rejected Him, but not all of them.  God has chosen a remnant (the elect) by grace and the others hearts’ were hardened towards Him.

Questions:

6)  Israel sought a law of righteousness.  They did not obtain it because righteousness is by faith, not works.

7 )  Personal Question.  My answer:

Isaiah 29:10-14:  The Lord has blinded some to faith and others He hasn’t.  Many have only a superficial faith–all words with no heart.

Psalm 69:22-26:  Some have eyes that cannot see the Truth and will face God’s wrath.

Matthew 13:12-15:  Jesus spoke in parables in order to reach those who do not understand and have hard hearts.

John 12:37-43:  Many did not believe in Jesus even after his miracles.  God had blinded them to the Truth and deadened their hearts. But some did believe.

Acts 28:24-28:  Paul would preach to the Jews and many would not believe.  Hence, God turned to the Gentiles who would listen.

Conclusions:  Nothing new here.  Many references in the Bible to the same idea:  Many heard the Truth and turned away.  Some believed.  This is true for us today.  Just tell the Truth.  Some will believe; some won’t.  It is God who chooses/elects.

End Notes:  [Same as Yesterday’s].  In the Old Testament, the Jews and Israel are God’s elect, those chosen to be those whom God revealed Himself and His will to, and through whom he could exhibit and declare to the world his purposes and salvation.  In the New Testament, Jesus is the Elect One, and through Him the church, replacing the old Israel in the purposes of God.  This new race is mostly composed of poor and ordinary people (1 Corinthians 1:27-29).

The question as to whether the Jews are, as a people, still the elect of God is faced by Paul here in Romans 9-11 in the light of the salvation of God in and through Jesus.  In chapters 9 & 10 Paul painfully admits that, on the whole, the Jews did not believe in Christ.  Despite all the advantages of Old Testament history, they “stumbled over the ‘stumbling stone'” (Romans 9:32).  In chapter 11, Paul goes back over that history and asks whether it was futile.  Will the Jews come to believe in Christ some day?  Did their tragic experience produce any advantage for the rest of the world?  This chapter clearly shows God’s eternal love for his chosen people.  Paul will conclude with a poetic outburst, celebrating God’s mysterious ways of working on earth.

Paul answers in Chapter 11:  If Israel’s rejection of the gospel was somehow both consistent with God’s eternal plan (Romans 9:1-29) and Israel’s own choosing (Romans 9:30-10:21), then does this mean that Israel’s fate is settled, and there is no possibility of restoration?  No!

For one, Paul is a Jew and he has been saved. We first look to ourselves for God’s grace.  There is a remnant of Jews who embrace Jesus and like Elijah, God will work through them for the sake of the others.  God often works in small groups and in the first century Jews believers in Christ were small and in Elijah’s time it was just him!

A remnant is “something left over”.  In the Bible, it’s those who would survive God’s judgement and become the new, true Israel.  The elect are those whom God has chosen for salvation out of His great love, not merit.

And it is by God’s grace (not works), and elect was chosen.  God enlightens whom He so chooses because He’s God and can do whatever He wants.  The Jews of Paul’s day were so secure in their idea of being the chosen people that the very idea became the thing that ruined them.  This spiritual dullness had continued since Isaiah’s day.

The passage from Psalm was probably originally spoken by David concerning his enemies; Paul uses it to describe the results of the divine hardening.

BSF Study Questions Romans Lesson 19, Day 2: Romans 11:1-10

Summary of passage:  God did not reject His people.  They have rejected Him, but not all of them.  God has chosen a remnant (the elect) by grace and the others hearts’ were hardened towards Him.

Questions:

3)  God has chosen some to believe in His Son.  Paul was chosen despite not believing in Christ in the beginning and Elijah was chosen as well, being the only one left standing.

4)  A remnant is those chosen by God through grace to believe in Christ.

5)  Part personal Question. My answer:  God shows grace to the elect or those chosen.  It is all by God’s grace that we are chosen.  It is out of our control.  He knows all.

Conclusions:  A lot more here.  We are studying this same passage tomorrow so we shall see what that brings.  Please see End Notes for more in-depth analysis.

End Notes:  In the Old Testament, the Jews and Israel are God’s elect, those chosen to be those whom God revealed Himself and His will to, and through whom he could exhibit and declare to the world his purposes and salvation.  In the New Testament, Jesus is the Elect One, and through Him the church, replacing the old Israel in the purposes of God.  This new race is mostly composed of poor and ordinary people (1 Corinthians 1:27-29).

The question as to whether the Jews are, as a people, still the elect of God is faced by Paul here in Romans 9-11 in the light of the salvation of God in and through Jesus.  In chapters 9 & 10 Paul painfully admits that, on the whole, the Jews did not believe in Christ.  Despite all the advantages of Old Testament history, they “stumbled over the ‘stumbling stone'” (Romans 9:32).  In chapter 11, Paul goes back over that history and asks whether it was futile.  Will the Jews come to believe in Christ some day?  Did their tragic experience produce any advantage for the rest of the world?  This chapter clearly shows God’s eternal love for his chosen people.  Paul will conclude with a poetic outburst, celebrating God’s mysterious ways of working on earth.

Paul answers in Chapter 11:  If Israel’s rejection of the gospel was somehow both consistent with God’s eternal plan (Romans 9:1-29) and Israel’s own choosing (Romans 9:30-10:21), then does this mean that Israel’s fate is settled, and there is no possibility of restoration?  No!

For one, Paul is a Jew and he has been saved. We first look to ourselves for God’s grace.  There is a remnant of Jews who embrace Jesus and like Elijah, God will work through them for the sake of the others.  God often works in small groups and in the first century Jews believers in Christ were small and in Elijah’s time it was just him!

A remnant is “something left over”.  In the Bible, it’s those who would survive God’s judgement and become the new, true Israel.  The elect are those whom God has chosen for salvation out of His great love, not merit.

And it is by God’s grace (not works), and elect was chosen.  God enlightens whom He so chooses because He’s God and can do whatever He wants.  The Jews of Paul’s day were so secure in their idea of being the chosen people that the very idea became the thing that ruined them.  This spiritual dullness had continued since Isaiah’s day.

The passage from Psalm was probably originally spoken by David concerning his enemies; Paul uses it to describe the results of the divine hardening.

Prayer Requests for Week of January 28th, 2018

Hey all!

Please leave prayer requests and updates.  You can email them to me at atozmom.wordpress@gmail.com or post them in the comments below.  I love praying for you all and firmly believe in the power of prayer.

Mine:  I am running for a local election where I live.  I would like prayer in this endeavor.  I also am trying to decide my work future as well.  My husband is also looking for more job opportunities and would like prayer for promotions soon.

God bless and Have an Amazing Week ahead!

BSF Study Questions Romans Lesson 18, Day 5: Romans 10:18-21

Summary of passage:  Israel heard the Good News, but chose to be disobedient and obstinate.  Instead, the Gentiles believed when the Good News was revealed to them.

Questions:

12) God revealed Himself to the Gentiles in an attempt to make the Israelites jealous and then turn to Him.  Hearing is listening to words but no action.  Understanding is knowing what the words mean but no action.  Believing is taking action and agreeing with the words.  For example, “Go pick up your room.”  My kids hear the command.  They understand it.  Then they ignore me and don’t do it.  Same with God.  “Believe in my Son.”  The Israelites heard this.  They understand it’s meaning.  But they turned their backs on Christ.

13)  The Israelites who did not believe in Christ.  The Gentiles who heard the Good News.

14)  Personal Question we just answered in Question 8.  My repetitive answer: Where is everywhere I encounter others whom He puts in my path whom He desires to be there.  I encourage others just by listening and sharing God’s truths about love and comfort and purpose, etc.

Conclusions:  Paul is saying Israel has no excuse for they have heard the message and declined.

End Notes:  Israel is ignoring God and the prophets, Moses and Isaiah, making them more accountable and responsible.  This, however, God knew.  God’s chosen people ignored Him, all the more heart-breaking to God.  He holds out His hands and they slap it away.  He continues to reach out to His people in spite of their disobedience.  Same for us.  God hurts when we reject Him.

Conclusions BSF Romans Lesson 18:  Not a lot of verses covered and a simple message by Paul:  All have heard the message and it is simply have faith in Christ.  Nice respite and should be fairly quick to complete.

BSF Study Questions Romans Lesson 18, Day 4: Romans 10:16-17

Summary of passage:  Not all the Israelites who heard the good news accepted.  Faith is accepting Christ.

Questions:

9)  It’s so simple people dismiss it.  Also, it requires believing in the unseen (Christ) and many resist that.  God hardens their hearts.  Man by nature is evil.  God is infinitely good.  The two don’t mix very well.

10)  “From hearing the message, and the message is heard through the word of Christ.”  The Bible, which is full of the message and the words of Christ, will strengthen our faith as we read, absorb, contemplate, and pray on God’s Holy words.  The more you study, the more doubt will be erased, and the more you are like Christ, and the more you can testify to others and spread the Good News.

11)  Personal Question.  My answer:  Too many to choose!  Always when I read or study the Bible something is renewed or strengthened or my understanding is deepened.  Not one second is wasted.  I turn to Him in the good and the bad.  Frequently, God’s word is something I need to hear at that moment and God is so good to direct me!  He is awesome!

Conclusions:  One important point to bring forth in this passage is this:  not all who hear God’s word will accept it.  This is so important to keep in mind as we share the Good News.  People aren’t rejecting us.  They are rejecting God.  Don’t take it personally.  Remember God has already chosen who will come to Him.  It is our job to put forth Him and let Him do the rest.

End Notes:  People are not saved without trust.  Many did not trust Isaiah or others who spoke of Jesus.  In the first century, most people could not read.  To know God and Christ, one had to be told.  Thus, “hearing the message.”  In our day, we are so blessed to be able to read the Word at our own pace, pray and think and contemplate it.  There really is no excuse for saving faith.