Why Could I Not Achieve Things Seemingly Impossible?

David Liss, The Whiskey Rebels, P.309

This makes me think of my novel.  I’m dreaming to get it (or some other writing) published against all odds and I think, “Why not me?”  I’m just like anybody else with a good story to tell so why not me?  Against all the rejections, the no’s, I should come out on top.  This is what keeps me going, keeps me writing, keeps me believing in myself and what I’m doing.  Hopes and dreams—if you don’t have those, you might as well give up.

There Was So Much Out There, All for Me to Take, if Only…

I would grasp it. P. 265

Another quote from David Liss’ The Whiskey Rebels.  Great stuff.  We all know that possibilities are endless in this world.  It’s the grasping part that hinders many of us.  Sometimes it’s the knowing what to grasp or the actual process of grasping it.  Later, Liss asks, “Why else live if not to do it?”

This is a great question because we can get caught up in the monotony of life and lose focus sometimes.  It’s good to be reminded now and again that there is more out there than getting the kids off to school, soccer practice, and dinner.  Life is about living and doing, not just living.

On p 286, “Everything begins with someone who either does something or does nothing…”

So my question to you is: which will you be today?

The Whiskey Rebels

I’m getting such gems from this book by David Liss (could I ever be this good?).  On P. 220, “…beauty that made me love her, before I knew that our minds were perfectly formed for one another…”  This is great because I think most marriages are this way.  You see the outside first but once you’re married, you know the person so intimately that it seems your minds are perfect for one another.  Each compliments the other’s strengths.  I know this is the case in my marriage.

Liss goes on further a few pages down, describing marriage as, “…committing to law what was already in our hearts,” which is basically what a marriage ceremony is—committing to both the laws of the land and God’s law.

“I should live the life of my innermost desires.” Liss says this on p. 245, describing what a character wants for his wife.  Isn’t this what we all want for ourselves as well?

I know for me this is what I strive for every day.  I get up each morning and exercise because I want to be healthy and strong for my family.  I sit at my computer endlessly, typing and attempting to create what is on my heart and on God’s.  I strive to get my kids into the school I want them to go to because I want the best for their little minds.  I homeschool them until that point because I believe that the public system is not good enough and, frankly, I can do a much better job than they can.  I want them to start taking lessons of some sort once we catch up financially so they can discover what their passions are in life and lead the life of their desires.  I want my husband to figure out his passion in life and follow that to wherever it leads.  I pray every day that I find a literary agent who believes in my work and therefore in me and what I’m trying to accomplish in this world.

I think we all want to be living for something, something of our choosing.  Is that too much to ask?

I Knew I Must Find My Voice, and Soon.

The above quote is P. 166 from “The Whiskey Rebels” by David Liss.  Great stuff.  It’s from a character who is struggling to write like I sometimes do.  A writer always knows they must find their voice and the sooner the better.

Three pages later, the same character says, “Somehow we were happy.  Somehow in the midst of our ruin we had each found something, some part of ourselves we had been missing, I in my writing and Andrew in his secret.”

I love this too.  I find myself in writing like this character speaks of.  This is just a reminder to follow your passion no matter how bad it gets.