BSF Study Questions People of the Promised Land 1: Lesson 30/Lesson Review

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BSF Study Questions People of the Promised Land 1: Lesson 30/Lesson Review

Day 1

1) I learned how God is faithful no matter what. His mercy is unfathomable as we constantly sin. His grace has no boundaries. His forgiveness is never-ending. His love is infinite. He wants to bless His people, and He will as long as you obey His commands. Knowing this gives me confidence moving forward with His plans for me.

Day 2

2) I learned I need Him more, I need to stay in His word and stay close to Him, and that I need to depend on Him more, pray more, and listen for Him more. I draw closer to God as I implement all this.

Day 3

3) I was more cognizant of other people in my life and of their needs. I thought of helping others more. I tried to do His will more. He was definitely in my thoughts more this year.

Day 4

4) I value the sacrifice Jesus made for me more, especially as I understand OT life more. What Jesus did for us on the cross is integral to who we are as Christians, and it needs to be impressed upon us more at church. When you finally grasp his sacrifice, your faith will grow accordingly. I’m more forgiving of others.

Day 5

5) I don’t speculate too far in the future because only God knows His ultimate plans for me. Right now, I’m just sticking to my current job until it’s time to move on. I’m sticking to my writings. I’m sticking to my hobbies. I’m raising my kids. Taking care of my husband, cats, and dogs. Living life according to His will.

Day 6

6) God is faithful. Everything happens in His timing. God does not forsake you. God has your life under control, even if you don’t. Everyone needs that encouragement.

Concluding thoughts to BSF’s People of the Promised Land 1

I enjoyed BSF’s People of the Promised Land 1. In church, we don’t spend a lot of time in the Old Testament, especially Joshua. It seems Moses is always central, but if it weren’t for Joshua, God’s people never would have made it to the Promised Land. It was wonderful to read all about Joshua, study some of the minor characters around him, such as Joab and Jeroboam — all of whom played a role in God’s history. Women of the Old Testament, such as Ruth and Abigail, were my favorite parts — probably because they were women and were intriguing characters. I just wish were were doing BSF’s People of the Promised Land 2 next year. I never understood the need to switch from Old Testament to New Testament every year. To me, do what makes sense no matter where in the Bible it is.

Thank you to all who shared with me this study. I love reading your comments, answering your questions, and learning what you’re learning. This forum gives me great joy and to see God grow it has been a blessing.

What will be happening this summer

This summer, I’ve decided to change the format again. Last summer, I did devotionals and prayers. This summer, I want to focus on the basics and will be writing more traditional blog posts on topics such as how to study the bible, who is God, who is Jesus, and is the Bible true. I will also be writing articles for those who are further along in their walk with God, such as how to go deeper in the Bible, what is the Bible telling me, and what is my responsibility as a believer. I am unsure how many times these will be posted as I intend to enjoy my break as well, spend time outside, and spend time with family. Furthermore, these articles will take me longer to write. The goal, however, will be 2-3 a week.

I wish everyone one a blessed and relaxing summer, full of memories and recharging, and I look forward to the Book of Acts next year!

BSF’s Future Studies Schedule

2019-20: Acts of the Apostles
2020-21: Genesis
2021-22: People of the Promised Land II
2022-beyond: To be determined

Side Note: Acts will be the first study I will be repeating. I have the old Acts questions still on my website, and as of now, am unsure if I will remove them. Here’s the dilemma: some of you may want to compare notes from the last time we did Acts (as I’m sure BSF will change the questions to fit their new format). However, for those searching for my updated questions, I don’t want to cause confusion. Input would be greatly appreciated!

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BSF Study Questions People of the Promised Land 1: Lesson 26, Day 4: 1 Kings 6:1-13

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Summary 1 Kings 6:1-13:

Four hundred and eighty years after God brought the Israelites out of Egypt, Solomon began the building of God’s temple. As the building of the temple was taking place, God came to Solomon and told him to keep His decrees, carry out His laws, regulations, and commands, and God would fulfill all the promises He gave to David through him.

BSF Study Questions People of the Promised Land 1: Lesson 26, Day 4: 1 Kings 6:1-13:

9) God asked Abraham to sacrifice his son, Isaac. David spared Saul’s life. Solomon builds God’s temple here. Jesus is sacrificed here, just on the other side of Mount Moriah. These are all places God spared people, which is what the temple does. It spares people of their sins once the atoning sacrifice is made. The final atoning sacrifice was made with Jesus’ crucifixion.

10) God came to Solomon and told him to keep His decrees, carry out His laws, regulations, and commands, and God would fulfill all the promises He gave to David through him. God also promised to live among the Israelites and not abandon them. God is omniscient so He knows the mistakes Solomon is about to make (idol worship, marrying foreign wives, building altars to foreign gods, etc). God is trying to warn Solomon before he chooses to make those mistakes.

11) Personal Question. My answer: He reminds me of my blessings in subtle ways like the beautiful sunrise or sunset. He places people in my life I can touch in small ways, like co-workers. He keeps my in His word with BSF. He reminds me all things are from Him.

Conclusions BSF Study Questions People of the Promised Land 1 Lesson 26 Day 4:1 Kings 6:1-13:

I love how God blesses and then He reminds to follow Him always. Then it’s just a matter of if we listen or not.

End Notes BSF Study Questions People of the Promised Land 1 Lesson 26, Day 4:1 Kings 6:1-13:

This time reference gives us dates for the Bible: The reign of Solomon began in 971 BC and ended at 913 BC (the temple was begun in 967 BC). This means that the Exodus took place in 1447 BC.

It took probably about three years to prepare timber from Lebanon for use in building. If Solomon began the construction of the temple in the fourth year of his reign, he probably started organizing the construction in the very first year of his reign.

Yet the work was carefully organized and planned even before Solomon became king. 1 Chronicles 28:11-12 tells us, Then David gave his son Solomon the plans for the vestibule, its houses, its treasuries, its upper chambers, its inner chambers, and the place of the mercy seat; and the plans for all that he had by the Spirit, of the courts of the house of the LORD, of all the chambers all around, of the treasuries of the house of God, and of the treasuries for the dedicated things.

The writer of 1 Kings never tells us exactly where the temple was built, but the writer of 2 Chronicles tells us that it was built on Mount Moriah (2 Chronicles 3:1), the same place where Abraham went to sacrifice Isaac and Jesus would be crucified (on another part of the hill).Image result for 1 kings 6

Four Main Structures of God’s Temple

  1. The temple proper (the house which King Solomon built), divided into two rooms (the holy place and the most holy place).
  2. The vestibule or entrance hall on the east side of the temple proper (the vestibule in front of the sanctuary). It was thirty feet (10 meters) wide and fifteen feet (5 meters) deep, and the same height as the temple proper.
  3. The three-storied side chambers (chambers all around) which surrounded the temple proper on the north, south, and west sides.
  4. A large courtyard surrounding the whole structure (the inner court mentioned in 1 Kings 6:36)

The temple proper was approximately 90 feet (30 meters) long, 30 feet (10 meters) wide, and 45 feet (15 meters) high. This was not especially large as ancient temples go, but the glory of Israel’s temple was not in its size.

Allowing for the outside storage rooms, the vestibule, and the estimated thickness of the walls, the total size of the structure was perhaps 110 feet, 37 meters long and 75 feet, 25 meters wide.

The dimensions of the temple also tell us that it was built on the same basic design as the tabernacle, but twice as large. This means that Solomon meant the temple to be a continuation of the tabernacle.

How God works

The stones used to build the temple were all cut and prepared at another site. The stones were only assembled at the building site of the temple.

  • The temple had to be built with human labor. God did not and would not send a team of angels to build the temple. Yet Solomon did not want the sound of man’s work to dominate the site of the temple. He wanted to communicate, as much as possible, that the temple was of God and not of man.
  • Often the greatest work in the Kingdom of God happens quietly. Yet the building site of the temple was only quiet because there was a lot of noise and diligent work at the quarry.

Image result for 1 kings 6God’s promise to Solomon

God promised an obedient Solomon that he would reign and be blessed, fulfilling the promises God made to David about his reign (2 Samuel 7:5-16). He also promised that His special presence would remain among Israel as a nation.

There was nothing particularly new in this promise. These are essentially the same promises of the Old Covenant made to Israel at Sinai. But this was an important reminder and renewal of previous promises.

God was careful not to say that He would live in the temple the way pagans thought their gods lived in temples. He would dwell among the children of Israel. The temple was a special place for man to meet with God.

BSF Study Questions People of the Promised Land 1: Lesson 23, Day 4: 1 Chronicles 22:1-19; 29:1-20

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Summary 1 Chronicles 22:1-19:

David helps prepare to build the temple. He gathers stonecutters to dress stone; he gathered iron, bronze, and cedar logs. He tells the leaders of Israel to help his son, Solomon, build the temple.

Summary 1 Chronicles 29:1-20:

David gives a speech to the people to help him build the temple, announcing all he has given and he gives more to the building of the temple. More people gave riches to help build the temple. David praises God, saying all of this is His anyways and prays Solomon stays devoted to God’s decrees and for him to build the temple.

BSF Study Questions People of the Promised Land 1: Lesson 23, Day 4: 1 Chronicles 22:1-19; 29:1-20:

9) Personal Question. My answer: David prayed that Solomon would wholeheartedly “keep God’s commandments, requirements, and degrees and to do everything to build God’s temple.” He prayed for Solomon to keep God’s laws, be strong and courageous, and not to afraid or discouraged. I pray for all I know to walk in Jesus’s ways and light. Praying to not be discouraged is important for all of us because we all are beaten down by the sins of this world.

10) David did all he could to help Solomon prepare to make God’s temple before he died. David prayed his thanks and acknowledged that everything came from God. He gave of his own treasures and led by example in this way.

11) David gives over and above everything he has already given. I need to be better at not just giving the minimum too.

Conclusions BSF Study Questions People of the Promised Land 1 Lesson 23 Day 4: 1 Chronicles 22:1-19; 29:1-20:

David shines in these passages as the man after God’s own heart. He is concerned in his last days that all is ready for the temple to be built by his son. He does all he can. He gives over and above. He prays for his son. He does everything. Great example of how we should be always, but especially at the end of our lives — making sure our legacy (kids) are set up for success when we depart this world.

Link to great book of Kings summary video HERE

End Notes BSF Study Questions People of the Promised Land 1 Lesson 23, Day 4: 1 Chronicles 22:1-19; 29:1-20:

Commentary 1 Chronicles 22:1-19:

1 Kings 5:15-18 describes how these Gentiles were actually put to work in the building of the temple in Solomon’s day, some 70,000 slaves.

The cedar trees of Lebanon were legendary for their excellent timber. This means David (and Solomon after him) wanted to build the temple out of the best materials possible.

This great temple to God would be built with “Gentile” wood and using “Gentile” labor. This temple was not only for Israel. Only Jews built the tabernacle, “But the temple is not built without the aid of the Gentile Tyrians. They, together with us, make up the Church of God.” (Trapp)

“The king’s provision of ‘a large amount of iron’ reflects how conditions had changed during his time – known archaeologically as Iron I – due, no doubt, to the incorporation of iron-producing Philistines within the sphere of Hebrew control.” Payne

David’s excitement over the temple

Solomon had the same vision for the glory of the temple, and he indeed built it according to David’s vision of a magnificent, famous, and glorious building. Solomon had this vision breathed into him through his father’s influence.

  • We can almost picture the old David and the young Solomon pouring over the plans and ideas for the temple together with excitement. David knew that it was not his place to build it but had the right vision for what the temple should be in general terms, and he passed that vision on to his son.

David was a peace with the idea that he himself could not build the temple and was content to prepare the way for his son to build it successfully.

Solomon building the temple was a sacred charge for him to fulfill. David knew that he could not fulfill this last great work of his life himself; he could only do it through Solomon. There was a sense in which if Solomon failed, David failed also.

Image result for 1 chronicles 22This explanation was not previously recorded, either in 2 Samuel or in 1 Chronicles. Here we find one of the reasons why God did not want David to build the temple, and why He chose Solomon instead. God wanted a man of rest and peace to build a house unto Him.

  • It wasn’t that David’s wars were wrong or ungodly, or that the blood he shed was unrighteous. It was that God wanted His house built from the context of peace and rest and victory; He wanted it to be built after and from the victory, not from the midst of struggle.

“The church (whereof the temple was a manifest and a illustrious type) should be built by Christ, the Prince of peace, Isaiah 9:6; and that it should be gathered and built up, not by might or power, or by force of arms, but by God’s Spirit, Zechariah 4:6.” (Poole)

The temple — Solomon’s greatest achievement

David knew that Solomon could not be strong or courageous without obedient fellowship with God.

God promised David that as long as his sons walked in obedience, they would keep the throne of Israel (1 Kings 2:1-4).

No matter what the Assyrians or the Egyptians or the Babylonians did, as long as David’s sons were obedient and followed God with their heart and with all their soul, God would establish their kingdom. He would take care of the rest.

David took seriously his mission to prepare the way by bringing both security and treasure to Israel and his successor Solomon. With these two resources he could build the house of the LORD.

  • The Bible tells us that Jesus – the greater Son of David – is also building a temple (Ephesians 2:19-22). He has prepared the building materials (his people.)

This is an enormous amount of gold. Some Bible commentators believe this large number is accurate and some feel it is a scribal error. Either way, David clearly amassed significant resources for a temple he would never build and told Solomon to receive these enormous resources and add to them.

David made all the preparation, but it was in vain if Solomon did not begin working.

David prepares the way for the Temple

David is an example of someone who works in the background, who receives none or little credit for his work, but the job cannot be done without him.

  • David gathered the materials for the temple.
  • David prepared some of those materials.
  • David won the peace with surrounding nations that Israel needed to build the temple.
  • David found and purchased the site to build the temple.
  • David established the plans for the temple.
  • David organized and commanded the administration and servants of the temple.

No one calls it “David’s temple.” It seems that all the credit, all the name, all the glory goes to Solomon. It didn’t bother David because he was a man after God’s heart — it was all about God — and always would be.

David knew that one leader was not enough to get a great work done. When God calls a leader, He also calls other to help.

“Thus Solomon came to the Jewish throne with every possible advantage. Had he made a proper use of his state and of his talents, he would have been the greatest as well as the wisest of sovereigns. But alas! How soon did this pure gold become dim! He began with an unlawful matrimonial connection; this led him to a commerce that was positively forbidden by the law of God: he then multiplied his matrimonial connections with pagan women; they turned his heart away from God, and the once wise and holy Solomon died a fool and an idolater.” (Clarke)

“The work is everlasting, though the workmen die. We pass away, as star by star grows dim; but the eternal light is never-fading. God shall have the victory.” (Spurgeon)

Commentary 1 Chronicles 29:1-20:

Before a great God there are no small works; everything should be done for the glory of God (Colossians 3:22)

David gave all he gave because he loved the house of God. We naturally give to and support that which we love. For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also (Matthew 6:21).

David specifically used the phrase house of my God to emphasize the personal connection; this was more personal than saying merely the house of God.

Why did the Israelites need to give to God?

  • Giving to God is a way to consecrate yourself to God.

“The king’s appeal for each giver to ‘consecrate himself’ reads literally ‘to fill his hand.’ This was a technical phrase used to describe ordination to the priesthood; and Scripture, significantly, places the act of giving on this same level of devotion.

The generous giving made David rejoice and praise God. It wasn’t for the sake of the wealth itself, but because it demonstrated that the hearts of the people were really interested in God and in His house. Cheerful giving (2 Corinthians 9:7)

Image result for 1 chronicles 29FUN FACT: This is the first time in the Bible that God is addressed directly as a Father over His people.

Jesus taught His disciples to pray beginning with this phrase, our Father (Matthew 6:9-13). Jesus may have had this passage in mind when teaching His disciples about prayer.

“This verse supplies the conclusion to the Lord’s Prayer: ‘For thine is the kingdom’ (Matthew 6:13, KJV

Gifts from God

David knew that both the ability and the heart to give were themselves gifts from God. He was actually humbled by having such a heart to give, both in himself and in the people of Israel as a group.  And keeping God’s commandments would be the key.