BSF Study Questions People of the Promised Land 1: Lesson 30/Lesson Review

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BSF Study Questions People of the Promised Land 1: Lesson 30/Lesson Review

Day 1

1) I learned how God is faithful no matter what. His mercy is unfathomable as we constantly sin. His grace has no boundaries. His forgiveness is never-ending. His love is infinite. He wants to bless His people, and He will as long as you obey His commands. Knowing this gives me confidence moving forward with His plans for me.

Day 2

2) I learned I need Him more, I need to stay in His word and stay close to Him, and that I need to depend on Him more, pray more, and listen for Him more. I draw closer to God as I implement all this.

Day 3

3) I was more cognizant of other people in my life and of their needs. I thought of helping others more. I tried to do His will more. He was definitely in my thoughts more this year.

Day 4

4) I value the sacrifice Jesus made for me more, especially as I understand OT life more. What Jesus did for us on the cross is integral to who we are as Christians, and it needs to be impressed upon us more at church. When you finally grasp his sacrifice, your faith will grow accordingly. I’m more forgiving of others.

Day 5

5) I don’t speculate too far in the future because only God knows His ultimate plans for me. Right now, I’m just sticking to my current job until it’s time to move on. I’m sticking to my writings. I’m sticking to my hobbies. I’m raising my kids. Taking care of my husband, cats, and dogs. Living life according to His will.

Day 6

6) God is faithful. Everything happens in His timing. God does not forsake you. God has your life under control, even if you don’t. Everyone needs that encouragement.

Concluding thoughts to BSF’s People of the Promised Land 1

I enjoyed BSF’s People of the Promised Land 1. In church, we don’t spend a lot of time in the Old Testament, especially Joshua. It seems Moses is always central, but if it weren’t for Joshua, God’s people never would have made it to the Promised Land. It was wonderful to read all about Joshua, study some of the minor characters around him, such as Joab and Jeroboam — all of whom played a role in God’s history. Women of the Old Testament, such as Ruth and Abigail, were my favorite parts — probably because they were women and were intriguing characters. I just wish were were doing BSF’s People of the Promised Land 2 next year. I never understood the need to switch from Old Testament to New Testament every year. To me, do what makes sense no matter where in the Bible it is.

Thank you to all who shared with me this study. I love reading your comments, answering your questions, and learning what you’re learning. This forum gives me great joy and to see God grow it has been a blessing.

What will be happening this summer

This summer, I’ve decided to change the format again. Last summer, I did devotionals and prayers. This summer, I want to focus on the basics and will be writing more traditional blog posts on topics such as how to study the bible, who is God, who is Jesus, and is the Bible true. I will also be writing articles for those who are further along in their walk with God, such as how to go deeper in the Bible, what is the Bible telling me, and what is my responsibility as a believer. I am unsure how many times these will be posted as I intend to enjoy my break as well, spend time outside, and spend time with family. Furthermore, these articles will take me longer to write. The goal, however, will be 2-3 a week.

I wish everyone one a blessed and relaxing summer, full of memories and recharging, and I look forward to the Book of Acts next year!

BSF’s Future Studies Schedule

2019-20: Acts of the Apostles
2020-21: Genesis
2021-22: People of the Promised Land II
2022-beyond: To be determined

Side Note: Acts will be the first study I will be repeating. I have the old Acts questions still on my website, and as of now, am unsure if I will remove them. Here’s the dilemma: some of you may want to compare notes from the last time we did Acts (as I’m sure BSF will change the questions to fit their new format). However, for those searching for my updated questions, I don’t want to cause confusion. Input would be greatly appreciated!

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BSF Study Questions People of the Promised Land 1: Lesson 29, Day 5: 1 Kings 11:26-43; Ecclesiastes 9:12; 12:1-14

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Summary of 1 Kings 11:26-43:

Jeroboam was in charge of the whole labor force of the house of Joseph. He ran into Ahijah, a prophet of Shiloh. Ahijah tore his new cloak into 12 pieces and gave Jeroboam 10 pieces, telling him God is going to give him 10 tribes, but allow Solomon to keep one tribe because of Solomon’s failure to walk in God’s ways, keep His commands and statues, and worship other gods. He will do this during Solomon’s son’s reign, who will be allowed to keep one tribe so David will always have a lamp in Jerusalem. If Jeroboam follows God’s commands and statues and obeys God, God will establish a dynasty for him and humble David’s descendants. Solomon tried to kill Jeroboam, but Jeroboam fled to Egypt until Solomon died. Solomon reigned 40 years and then died. His son, Rehoboam, succeeded him.

Summary of Ecclesiastes 9:12; 12:1-14:

No one knows when they will die. Remember God for everything in the world is meaningless. Fear God and keep his commandments, for this is the whole duty of man. For God will bring every deed into judgment.

BSF Study Questions People of the Promised Land 1: Lesson 29, Day 5: 1 Kings 11:26-43; Ecclesiastes 9:12; 12:1-14:

12) God is going to give him 10 tribes during Solomon’s son’s reign. If Jeroboam follows God’s commands and statues and obeys God, God will establish a dynasty for him and humble David’s descendants.

13) His last months were probably empty, devoid of God, and meaning nothing to him. He had everything except God. Thus, Solomon had nothing. He probably realizes he needed to have kept God’s commandments all the days of his life.

14) Personal Question. My answer: You can have all the blessings in the world, have everything the world had to offer, but without God, you have nothing.  You are alone, and you’ll die feeling unfulfilled. It’s important to remember to obey God and not to allow little sins in your life and excuse them away. The little sins are as big as the big sins, and they all matter to God.

Conclusions BSF Study Questions People of the Promised Land 1 Lesson 29 Day 5: 1 Kings 11:26-43; Ecclesiastes 9:12; 12:1-14:

I’m struck by how little is recorded of Solomon’s death; whereas, we have all the details of David’s death. We know Solomon must have had a huge funeral celebration of life like David, but it’s not in the Bible. Solomon seemed to have died empty inside, having sold his soul with idol worship. A man surrounds himself with 1000 women and still dies alone. Sad, very sad.

End Notes BSF Study Questions People of the Promised Land 1 Lesson 29, Day 5: 1 Kings 11:26-43; Ecclesiastes 9:12; 12:1-14:

Commentary 1 Kings 11:26-43:

The name Jeroboam means, “may the people be great.” We are not told why Jeroboam rebelled against Solomon .Jewish traditions say Jeroboam opposed the oppressive use of forced labor in Solomon’s building projects. Since he was the officer over all the labor force, this tradition makes some sense.

Image result for 1 kings 11God promised to divide Israel and put ten of the twelve tribes under Jeroboam as judgment for the sin and idolatry of Solomon. God would still keep one tribe under the house of David in faithfulness to His promise to David.

Fun Fact: This is the first we hear of the divided kingdom, which became Israel’s history for hundreds of years after the death of Solomon. We would expect that the ten tribes under Jeroboam would be larger, greater, and more enduring than the one tribe left unto the House of David. As it turned out, just the opposite happened because the ten tribes forsook the Lord, while the one tribe was more obedient. God is more powerful than numbers.

God’s promise to Jeroboam

  • God promised to make a lasting dynasty for Jeroboam, if he would do what is right in the sight of the Lord. An obedient Jeroboam had the opportunity to establish a parallel dynasty to the House of David.

Both Jeroboam and David were appointed by God to follow after disobedient kings. David waited upon the Lord to make the throne clear, and God blessed his reign. Jeroboam did not wait on the Lord but made his own way to the throne, and God did not bless his reign.

Solomon sought to kill Jeroboam. Solomon thought he could defeat God’s will, but he was unsuccessful. God’s word through Ahijah proved true.

Solomon’s death

Many commentators believe that Solomon began his reign when he was about 20 years old. This means that Solomon did not live a particularly long life. The promise made in 1 Kings 3:14 was not fulfilled to Solomon because of his disobedience.

“Then Solomon rested with his fathers” is a familiar phrase used in 1 and 2 Kings (used 25 times) and was used of such wicked kings as Ahab (1 Kings 22:40). It means that Solomon passed to the world beyond. We cannot say with certainty that he is in heaven.

Based on this chapter, there is no hope or cheer at the end, which leads many commentators to conclude that Solomon died in apostasy.

However, it may be that Solomon was shown special mercy for the sake of David his father (as in 2 Samuel 7:14-15, if that promise also applies to Solomon as well as the Messiah). Some also believe that Solomon wrote the Book of Ecclesiastes at the very end of his life as a renunciation of his fall into vanity.

Commentary Ecclesiastes 9:12; 12:1-14:

When there is more to life than what we can see – there is an eternity and an eternal God to reckon with – then the legitimate pleasures of life can be enjoyed in the best sense. One doesn’t try to find meaning in those pleasures, but simply some good seasoning for a life that finds its meaning in eternity and the eternal God.

One may live according to their heart and by what they see; but they should not think that their own heart  or  eyes will be their judge.

Image result for Ecclesiastes 12.Theme of Ecclesiastes 12:

Life is lived not only for this life but also for eternity, knowing that good will be rewarded and evil will be condemned perfectly by the God who will bring you into judgment. Literally, Solomon spoke of the judgment, referring to our great accountability before God.

Knowing there is an eternity, we can:

  • Remove sorrow from our hearts
  • Live a holy, godly life in our days on earth.

Apostle Paul later wrote, Therefore, my beloved brethren, be steadfast, immovable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, knowing that your labor is not in vain in the Lord. (1 Corinthians 15:58)

The Apostle Paul: If in this life only we have hope in Christ, we are of all men the most pitiable (1 Corinthians 15:19)

Fun Fact: This is the first mention of God as Creator. To this point the Preacher worked hard to ignore the eternal God one must stand before in the future; yet he also refused to think about the Creator God who existed before he did. This self-imposed ignorance relieved the sense of accountability before the Creator, which still must be accounted for in the life to come.

Creator is a plural form in Hebrew, suggesting greatness of majesty.” (Eaton)

Most agree that what follows here is a poetic description of the effects of advancing age.

  • The arms and hands that keep the body now begin to tremble (the keepers of the house tremble).
  • The legs and knees begin to sag (the strong men bow down).
  • Teeth are lost and chewing is more difficult (the grinders cease because they are few).
  • The eyes are dimmed (the windows grow dim).
  • The ears become weaker and weaker (the sound of grinding is low).
  • Sleep becomes more difficult and one is easy wakened (one rises up at the sound of a bird).
  • Singing and music are less appreciated (the daughters of music are brought low).
  • One becomes more fearful in life (afraid of height, and of terrors in the way).
  • The hair becomes white (the almond tree blossoms).
  • The once active become weak (the grasshopper is a burden).
  • The passions and desires of life weaken and wane (desire fails).

Image result for Ecclesiastes 12.At the end of advancing age is eternity. Remember God before this life is over. Life is meaningless without God.

How to proclaim God’s truth

  • The teacher should teach the people knowledge.
  • The teacher should seek to find acceptable words.
  • The teacher should seek to bring forth that which is upright – words of truth.
  • The teacher should make his words as goads and well-driven nails, with point and direction.
  • The teacher should bring forth the words given by one Shepherd.
  • The teacher should realize that good study is wearisome to the flesh and be willing to pay that price.

Don’t believe everything you read.

Conclusion to Ecclesiastes 12:

Obey God and live for eternity and prepare for judgment.

Fun fact: This is the only place in Ecclesiastes where the commands of God are mentioned.

When there is an eternal accounting, everything has meaning and importance, both for the present and for eternity.

Paul explained:  For our light affliction, which is but for a moment, is working for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory, while we do not look at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen. For the things which are seen are temporary, but the things which are not seen are eternal. For we know that if our earthly house, this tent, is destroyed, we have a building from God, a house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens. For in this we groan, earnestly desiring to be clothed with our habitation which is from heaven. (2 Corinthians 4:17-5:2)

BSF Study Questions People of the Promised Land 1: Lesson 29, Day 3: 1 Kings 11:9-13

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Summary 1 Kings 11:9-13:

The Lord became angry at Solomon for his heart had turned away from God and promised Solomon to tear away his kingdom and give it to one of his subordinates, but not during Solomon’s lifetime out of respect for his father, David. God would take the kingdom away from Solomon’s son instead — and not the whole tribe but just one tribe away from Solomon’s son (here we see the split in Israel happening).

BSF Study Questions People of the Promised Land 1: Lesson 29, Day 3: 1 Kings 11:9-13:

6) God was angry because Solomon’s heart had turned away from Him. He had built altars to other gods and worshipped them. Our God is a jealous God.  Following God leads to eternal life and joy in God’s presence. Everything is meaningless of this world without God. God is the only One, True God. God carries His people and sustains them/us and rescues us. God’s plans prevail. God is our creator and gives us life.

7) Part personal Question. My answer: People worship others, celebrities, material items, careers, kids, hobbies, or pets. An idol is anything you put above God or something your worship. I don’t worship anything really. I have passions and hobbies, but nothing I can’t live without.

8 ) God and promised Solomon to tear away his kingdom and give it to one of his subordinates, but not during Solomon’s lifetime out of respect for his father, David. God would take the kingdom away from Solomon’s son instead — and not the whole tribe but just one tribe away from Solomon’s son (here we see the split in Israel happening). God has mercy on His people by not punishing Solomon out of respect for David and not taking away the entire kingdom. God is just, and He does things with others in mind (like His people whom He knows needs a leader right now and not to be in foreign hands.

Conclusions BSF Study Questions People of the Promised Land 1 Lesson 29 Day 3: 1 Kings 11:9-13:

It’s sad to read about Solomon’s downfall, but instructive to us. We see the consequences Solomon could not, and we can learn from his mistakes.

End Notes BSF Study Questions People of the Promised Land 1 Lesson 29, Day 3: 1 Kings 11:9-13:

God had good reason to be displeased with Solomon: He had appeared to him twice, and Solomon still turned to other gods. Solomon’s sin was base ingratitude and a waste of great spiritual privilege.

We sometimes think that great spiritual experiences (like praying for a miracle or a sign) will keep us from sin and will keep us faithful to God. Solomon, the wisest man who ever lived, saw God and turned. What would be our reaction?

God promised the entire kingdom of Israel to the descendants of David forever, if they only remained obedient. David reminded Solomon of this promise shortly before his death (1 Kings 2:4). Yet they could not remain faithful even one generation.

Solomon’s kingdom had outstanding wealth, military power, and prestige. Yet the true security of Israel was in the blessing of God and in the obedience and faithfulness of their king.

Even in this great judgment, God shows undeserved mercy with deserved judgment. God announces that the kingdom will be divided, and part of it will be loyal to the descendants of David and part of it will be under a different dynasty.

Many other passages in the Old Testament (such as 2 Chronicles 11:12) tell us that the southern kingdom was made up of two tribes, Judah and Benjamin. Several times in this chapter the southern kingdom is referred to as one tribe. This is because either Benjamin is swallowed up in Judah, or the idea was one tribe in addition to Judah.

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BSF Study Questions People of the Promised Land 1: Lesson 28, Day 5: 1 Kings 10:14-29; Psalm 72

Summary of 1 Kings 10:14-29:

Solomon accumulated gold and shields. He made a huge throne of ivory and gold. Everything was made of gold. He engaged in foreign trade with gold, silver, ivory, apes, and baboons. Solomon was greater in riches and wisdom than any other earthly king. Everyone sought his advice and gave him gifts in return. Solomon accumulated chariots and horses, and silver was common in Jerusalem.

Summary of Psalm 72:

David prays for Solomon. He asks God to endow him with justice. The people will prosper. He will defend the afflicted and help the children of the poor. Solomon will endure and be prosperous. All kings will bow to him. May he live long and his name endure forever. Let all nations be blessed by him. Praise to God.

BSF Study Questions People of the Promised Land 1: Lesson 28, Day 5: 1 Kings 10:14-29; Psalm 72:

12) Part personal Question. My answer. Solomon was just to the people. He judged in righteousness. He defended the afflicted and saved the children of the needy. He lived a long life. He ruled a vast area. The desert tribes bowed before him. He was brought tribute by distant kings. The kings of Sheba and Seba presented him with gifts. All kings will bow down to Solomon and serve him. He rescued the needy. People prayed for him and blessed him. The land was plentiful. His name endures forever. All nations were blessed by him, and they called Solomon blessed. It doesn’t really encourage me to pray. We should be praying for all those lost anyways and for all we know to prosper, for those who are suffering, and for God to show up in lives and bless people.

13) Part personal Question. My answer: When you have great wealth, you have great responsibility.  People want to learn from you, and you are obligated to help them be better people. You also have an obligation to take care of those less fortunate than you — both financially and with your time. My lesson is when you’re successful, you need to help others who are struggling. Share your wealth. Bless others.

Conclusions BSF Study Questions People of the Promised Land 1 Lesson 28 Day 5: 1 Kings 10:14-29; Psalm 72:

This shows the power of prayer of parents for their children. King David prayed powerfully for Solomon, and God granted all of David’s requests. Solomon was indeed blessed by God, in part because of David’s faithfulness to God. It also shows the power of God’s blessings when you walk in His ways.

End Notes BSF Study Questions People of the Promised Land 1 Lesson 28, Day 5: 1 Kings 10:14-29; Psalm 72:

Commentary 1 Kings 10:14-29:

This was a vast amount of gold, which came to Solomon yearly. One commentator estimated the value of the 666 talents of gold at $281,318,400. According to the value of gold in 2015, it would be just under $1 billion dollars. This speaks not only to the great wealth of Solomon, but it also makes him the only other person in the Bible associated with the number 666.

The other Biblical connection to 666 is the end-times world dictator and opponent of God and His people often known as the Antichrist (Revelation 13:18). In fact, the Revelation passage specifically says that the number 666 is the number of a man, and the man may be Solomon. This isn’t to say that Solomon was the Antichrist or that the coming Antichrist will be some strange reincarnation of Solomon.

1 Kings assumes that we know of the instructions for future kings of Israel in Deuteronomy 17:14-20. God blessed Solomon with great riches, but Solomon allowed that blessing to turn into a danger because he disobediently multiplied silver and gold for himself.

According to Dilday, each large shield was worth about $120,000 ($250,000 at 2015 values). The smaller shields were worth $30,000 ($57,000 at 2015 values). $33 million was invested in gold ceremonial shields.

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King Solomon surpassed all the kings of the earth in riches and wisdom

The promises of Deuteronomy 28:1-14 were fulfilled in his reign: The LORD will open to you His good treasure, the heavens, to give the rain to your land in its season, and to bless all the work of your hand. You shall lend to many nations, but you shall not borrow(Deuteronomy 28:12).

There were few military conflicts during the reign of Solomon, yet he still saw the importance of a strong defense. Perhaps there were few military conflicts because Solomon had a strong defense.

Remains of Solomon’s fortress and stables at Megiddo can be seen today.

When we think of Solomon’s great wealth, we also consider that he originally did not set his heart upon riches. He deliberately asked for wisdom to lead the people of God instead of riches or fame. God promised to also give Solomon riches and fame, and God fulfilled His promise.

Solomon gave an eloquent testimony to the vanity of riches as the preacher in the Book of Ecclesiastes. He powerfully showed that there was no ultimate satisfaction through materialism. We don’t have to be as rich as Solomon to learn the same lesson.

Image result for psalm 72Multiplying horses was in direct disobedience to Deuteronomy 17:16, which said to the Kings of Israel: But he shall not multiply horses for himself, nor cause the people to return to Egypt to multiply horses, for the LORD has said to you, “You shall not return that way again.”

Solomon traded in horses with the kings of the Hittites and Syria. Solomon could have used this as an excuse, saying he was not using the horses for himself. Many examples of gross disobedience begin as clever rationalizations.

Commentary Psalm 72:

The title of this Psalm is, A Psalm of Solomon. It is possible to translate the Hebrew here (and in almost all the Psalms which reference an author) as “A Psalm to Solomon,” and some have regarded it as David’s Psalm to and about his son Solomon and his Greater Son the Messiah. Yet, the most natural way to take the title is as it is given, A Psalm of Solomon and that the line about David in 72:20 refers to the collection of Book Two of the Psalms, which is heavy with David’s Psalms, separating it from Book Three, which begins with 11 Psalms authored by Asaph.

It is possible that Solomon complied this second book of the Psalms (Psalms 42-72) and composed this Psalm as a fitting conclusion for the collection of mostly David’s Psalms. It is a fitting conclusion, because it unexpectedly does not focus upon David himself, but on the Messiah – the King of Kings and the Son of David.

“The New Testament nowhere quotes it as Messianic, but this picture of the king and his realm is so close to the prophecies of Isaiah 11:1-5 and Isaiah 60-62 that if those passages are Messianic, so is this.” (Derek Kidner)

Righteousness dominates this opening, since in Scripture it is the first virtue of government, even before compassion (which is the theme of verses 12-14).” (Kidner)

Sometimes mountains represent human governments in the Bible, and David may have intended this allusion. He had in mind a national government (mountains) that blessed the people and local government (the little hills) that ruled with righteousness. This godly government would accomplish at least three things:

  1. The king and his government will make sure that justice is administered fairly.
  2. The king and his government will rescue those most vulnerable in society.
  3. The king and his government will protect Israel, keeping them free from external domination and from internal corruption.

However, the mountains could stand for something else:

  • Geddes wrote they spoke of messengers placed on a series of mountains or hilltops distributed news through a land.
  • Mollerus wrote that it spoke of the fertility of soil on the mountains.
  • Caryl wrote that it speaks of the safety from robbers who often infested mountain passes.
  • Alexander Maclaren wrote of another sense: “The mountains come into view here simply as being the most prominent features of the land.”

Image result for psalm 72Psalm 72:5-7

  • The answer to the prayer would mean that the people of Israel – the king, his government, and the people – would fear the Lord forever, throughout all generations.
  • The Scriptures often connect the ideas of righteous, just government, and blessing upon the ecology and produce of the land.
  • As God sends such a rich blessing His people would flourish and there would be an abundance of peace (shalom) that will last beyond comprehension (until the moon is no more).
  • In a greater sense, it points to Jesus alone. The connection between the righteous and peace reminds us of Melchizedek, the One who was and is both the King of Righteousness and the King of Peace (Hebrews 7:1-3).
  • To oppose the King with such a great dominion meant certain defeat. His enemies would be brought low in a way associated with the curse upon The Enemy in Genesis 3:14-15.

“Bear in mind that it was a custom with many nations that, when individuals approached their kings, they kissed the earth, and prostrated their whole body before them. This was the custom especially throughout Asia.” (LeBlanc, cited in Spurgeon)

All kings shall fall down was prophesied in a beautiful word from the prophet Nathan in 2 Samuel 7, which had in mind both David’s immediate son and successor (Solomon) and David’s ultimate Son and Successor (Jesus the Messiah). Both were in view in 2 Samuel 7:11-16, and both are in view in Psalm 72. The fulfillment in Solomon’s day is described in 1 Kings 10:23-25

“The distant nations are the kings of the ‘distant shores’ (72:10): Tarshish (cf. Psalm 48:7), Sheba (modern Yemen), and Seba (an African nation: cf. Genesis 10:7Isaiah 43:345:14

Tarshish may have been Tartessus in Spain; it was in any case a name associated with long voyages; likewise the isles or ‘coastlands’ were synonymous with the ends of the earth: see, e.g. Isaiah 42:10.” (Kidner)

Psalm 72:12-14

  • The justice and righteousness David prayed for and aspired to regarding Solomon’s reign (Psalm 72:1-4) will be perfectly fulfilled in the Greater King.
  • “The king is represented in Psalms 72:14 as taking on himself the office of Goel, or Kinsman-Redeemer, and ransoming his subjects’ lives from ‘deceit and violence.’” (Maclaren)

Blessed as it was, Solomon’s own reign did not live up to this fully. After his death they complained of his oppression (1 Kings 12:4). “Solomon continues to speak more wisely than he was ever to act.” (Kidner)

The lives of the poor and needy are often considered to be of little value. The Messiah, the Greater King, will regard their life as precious. This is especially meaningful when we consider the cheap regard for life outside and before the world influenced by Christianity.

Image result for animals of the biblePsalm 72:15-17

Commentators debate verses 15-17 if the He spoken of here refers to the ransomed man of the previous lines or of the King who ransomed him. Since the previous lines speak of a multitude redeemed and this He speaks of One, and because the following lines fit much better with the King, we regard He shall live as both a wish and a declaration for the King.

“How little this might mean is obvious from the address, ‘O king, live forever’, in the book of Daniel; yet also how much, can be seen from the Messianic prophecies and from the way these were understood in New Testament times.” (Kidner)

The Greater King would receive gifts and honor and praise. He would bestow great blessing on the earth (an abundance of grain in the earth) and upon His people (those of the city shall flourish).

“Gold, grain, and fruit were ancient measures of prosperity. So this is a way of saying that under the reign of Jesus there will be prosperity of every conceivable kind.” (Boice)

David recognized that this King of Kings was not only the fulfillment of the promise made to him in 2 Samuel 7:11-16. It was also the fulfillment of the great promise made to Abraham in Genesis 12:1-3In you all the families of the earth shall be blessed.

Themes of Psalm 72

Psalm 72 speaks powerfully of the kingdom of the King of Kings and speaks of it in terms of His personal rule, not ruling through an institution such as the Church. “In this Psalm, at least, we see a personal monarch, and he is the central figure, the focus of all the glory; not his servant, but himself do we see possessing the dominion and dispensing the government. Personal pronouns referring to our great King are constantly occurring in this Psalm; he has dominion, kings fall down before him,: and serve him; for he delivers; he spares, he saves, he lives, and daily is he praised.” (Spurgeon)

There is also a tragedy in this Psalm. As high as it soars with the concept of the king and his reign, we remember the sad disappointment of how quickly the monarchy in Israel declined after Solomon. There were certainly some good kings after Solomon, but the glory of the kingdom went from Solomon’s gold (1 Kings 10:16-17) to Rehoboam’s bronze (1 Kings 14:25-28) in only about five years.