BSF Study Questions Romans Lesson 14, Day 5: Romans 8:26-27

Summary of passage:  The Holy Spirit helps us and intercedes for us on this side of heaven.

Questions:

11) Part personal Question.  My answer:

Romans 8:26-27:  The Holy Spirit helps us in our weakness, intercedes for us, and guides us in prayer.

Luke 12:12:  The Holy Spirit teaches you what to say.

Acts 1:8:  The Holy Spirit brings you power and is a witness.

Acts 16:6-10; 20:22: The Holy Spirit protects you in various ways such as guiding your path and in some cases preventing you from going places and re-directing you such as in this case with Paul who was prevented from speaking in Asia (probably because it was too dangerous).  The Spirit also compels you to go places as well and warns you of dangers and hardships (Read Acts 20:23) and in Paul’s case, prison.

Ephesians 4:3-4:  Be peaceful with others (especially believers) as you all all one like God the Father.

Ephesians 6:17:  The Word of God is the sword of the Spirit (so a weapon) to defend against evil upon you.

1 Corinthians 2:12:  The Spirit imparts God’s wisdom and discernment and knowledge so that we may understand what God has freely given us as well as God’s character, Jesus, the Bible, and all things God desires us to know.

In my life, the Holy Spirit is omnipresent to guide me, protect me, move me from wrongs and nudge me to rights, and comfort me in my daily life.  The Holy Spirit offers me understanding and discernment when I pray and events happen in my life.  The Holy Spirit is power against the devil and strength and fortitude and perseverance.  The Holy Spirit is God within.  How amazing!

12a)  The key here is the definition of “intercede” which is according to Webster’s Dictionary “to intervene between parties with a view to reconciling differences; mediate.”  Intercession (the noun form of intercede) means “the act of pleading on behalf of someone else.”  God sent the Spirit to plead on behalf of us to Him.  Or God Himself (who is the Holy Spirit) helps by making intercession for us.  The Holy Spirit searches our hearts and guides our prayers according to God’s will.

b)  Personal Question.  My answer:  Jesus and anyone who prays for you:  pastor, friends, family, strangers, etc.  I pray chiefly for family, self, friends, kids, neighbors, and strangers and all who are lost and broken and need Jesus.

Conclusions:  Good lesson on the importance of God’s gift of the Holy Spirit in our lives, what the Spirit does for us and its importance, and how we really couldn’t function without it.  I pray quite often when I don’t know what to pray for this:  “God you know what I need, the needs of those around me, and others, please do your Will because I don’t know it.”

End Notes:  “In the same way” connects verses 25 and 26.  As hope sustains believers when they suffer, so the Holy Spirit helps them when they pray.

Verse 23 we saw us groaning.  Here it is the Holy Spirit.

Groans with words that cannot express:  This help from the Spirit may include praying with the spiritual gift of tongues (1 Corinthians 14:214-15), but it is certainly not limited to praying in an unknown language.  Paul could mean unspoken words as well.

The idea is simply of communication beyond our ability to express. The deep groanings within us cannot be articulated apart from the interceding work of the Holy Spirit.

This, of course, is the purpose of the gift of tongues – to enable us to communicate with God in a manner that is not limited to our own knowledge or ability to articulate our heart before God. The purpose of tongues is not to prove that we are “filled with the Spirit” or to prove that we are especially spiritual.

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BSF Study Questions Romans Lesson 14, Day 4: Romans 8:23-25

Summary of passage:  We groan as we wait for our future glory.  Hope for what we don’t have makes it all the more sweeter when it arrives.

Questions:

9)  We/our bodies groan as we await Jesus’s Second Coming and the freedom he shall bring from death and decay.  Creation also groans (in the previous passage) for the same reasons.

10a)  We hope for what we do not yet have (in this case our future glory and resurrection and end of suffering) patiently.

b)  Personal Question.  My answer:  Probably the same things we all wait and hope for.  On this side of heaven, an easier/better life away from suffering, pain, anxiety, fear, etc.  On the other side of heaven, Jesus and glory.

Conclusions:  This was merely an exposition on the previous verses as Paul says the same things in different ways with different analogies.

End Notes:  The firstfruits of the Spirit is we have a taste of what is to come as we experience a bit of Jesus’s glory here on earth, but we long for its fulfillment.  Same thing with adoption.  We await its fulfillment (Romans 8:15).  All with perseverance.

The presence of the Holy Spirit in believers is evidence of our present salvation and a pledge of our future inheritance.  We are already God’s children and we await our inheritance in Christ.

The redemption of our bodies (resurrection) is the final stage of our adoption.  We see the first stage in Ephesians 1:5 and the second is us living as God’s children (Romans 8:14 & Galatians 3:25-26).

BSF Study Questions Romans Lesson 14, Day 3: Romans 8:19-22

Summary of passage:  All of creation (everything outside of man like earth and the animals) awaits Jesus’s Second Coming (the liberation of the bondage man created with the First Sin and the glorious freedom promised).

Questions:

6)  Creation is everything outside of man like the earth and the animals.

7)  Everything is subject to death (the plants and animals).

8 )  Part personal Question.  My answer:  Jesus’s Second Coming.  No where does this passage talk about “proper creation care”, “idolizing nature”, or “trusting in people’s efforts to renew the planet” which wasn’t a concern 2000 years ago when Paul wrote these words.  This question does not make sense to me (so if it does to you, please leave a comment) and in my opinion has nothing to do with this passage.  In my life, I have little time to worry about renewing the planet or the few who idolize nature.  Frankly, it’s none of my concern.  I have way too much going on in my own little world to worry about others and their problems.

Conclusions:  I have no clue how BSF got question 8 from this passage besides out of nowhere.  Paul is simply saying everything will be renewed when Christ comes again.  Period.  None of this other stuff.  Baffled to say the least.  The rest of the questions on this lesson as well don’t make much sense.  Worst Lesson of this study so far for me.

End Notes:  Isaiah 11:6-9 describes what will happen in that day as the lion lays with the lamb.

Was subjected to frustration refers to Genesis 3:17-19 and God subjects creation in hope refers to Genesis 3:15.

The physical universe is not destined for destruction (annihilation) but for renewal.  Living things will no longer be subject to death and decay as they are today under the Fallen World.  I think this is BSF’s intended point in Question 8 is to get us to come to this conclusion (basically not to believe the doomsdayers who say the world is going to end–it’s not) but the way BSF went about it was convoluted, befuddled, and confounding.

BSF Study Questions Romans Lesson 13, Day 4: Romans 8:12-14

Summary of passage:  Since believers have the Spirit of Christ indwelt, our responsibility is to live according to the Spirit.

Questions:

9)  To live according to the Spirit of Christ because we are sons of God and are now holy.

10a)  By living according to the Spirit and submitting to it.  Loving your neighbor.  Giving up all earthly sins such as sexual immorality, impurity, evil desires, greed, idolatry, anger, rage, malie, slander, lies, etc.  Instead, be compassionate, kind, humble, gentle, and patient.  Forgive each other.  Let peace reign in your hearts.

b)  Part personal Question.  My answer:  We’re to let the Spirit reign and not the flesh.  I need help in loving others and self-control when I’m angry and self-control with my words.

Conclusions: Stretched the questions since only 2 verses.  In essence:  Live a Godly life as God’s children.  Period.

End Notes:  Paul reminds us the flesh leads to death.  We are often deceived in this because in the moment living according to the flesh feels good.

When you become a son of God, the Spirit leads.  The Spirit leads us into truth, love, faithfulness, holiness, repentance, usefulness, and Jesus-like.

God is the creator of all but not all are His children.  You must believe in Jesus as His Son and Savior.  When this happens, the hallmark is a life led by God’s Spirit.

BSF Study Questions Romans Lesson 13 Day 3: Romans 8:5-11

 Summary of passage:  There are those who live according to sin and those who live according to the Spirit.  The sinful mind rebels against God.  The Spirit mind obeys God and experience life and peace.  The Spirit lives within those who belong to Christ.  Our Spirit is alive by righteousness and God will give life to our mortal bodies through the Spirit as well.

Questions:

6)  Those who live according to the sinful nature and those who live according  to the Spirit.  Sinful nature people have their minds set on what nature desires.  These people are set on death and hostile to God and do not submit to God’s law.  They can never please God.  Spirit people have their minds set on what the Spirit desires.  Spirit people live in life and peace.

7)  Part personal Question we’ve answered before:  The fruits produced by the Spirit are:  love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control.  The mind is focused on heavenly things not earthly things.  I hope others say they see God in me, but I can never be sure since in my mind I fail too much daily to be Godly.

8 )  Part personal Question that doesn’t necessarily encourage me today:  Your spirit is alive through righteousness and your physical body will rise as well through the Spirit.  We are controlled by the Spirit, not by our sinful nature.  All who have the Spirit belong to God/Christ.  In general, I’m encouraged every day by the Spirit that lives in me, who guides me, and empowers me to get out of bed every day and face this fallen world that sometimes weighs me down with its brokenness.  It’s hard to put into words God’s amazingness.

Conclusions:  Question 6 you can basically copy verbatim verses 5-8 and have the answer.  Basically, if you have Christ, you have the Spirit.  The Spirit is God’s gift to us to guide us, lead us, be with us, comfort us, and strengthen us–to have God with us always.

End Notes:  You know if you’re in the Spirit or the flesh by where your mind is.  The flesh or sinful mind battles against God because it does not want to submit.  The law is powerless to help us in this battle.  You will never please God as long as the flesh is winning.

With the gift of the Holy Spirit, believers have the power to defeat the flesh.  If you are a Christian, you have the Spirit.  If not, you do not.  Simple.

However, you may still miss out on living the Christian life because you are not in tune with the Spirit (Ephesians 5:18).

How do you know if you have the Spirit?  Are you striving to be more like Jesus every day?

Our Spirit is alive because of Jesus abiding inside us and we will experience resurrection in the Last Days because of the presence of the Holy Spirit.

BSF Study Questions Romans Lesson 13, Day 2: Romans 8:1-4

Summary of passage:  Those who have Christ Jesus in their hearts are now free from condemnation and live according to the Spirit.  With Jesus’s death believers were set free.  He served as our sin offering forever and did what the law could not do due to man’s sinful nature.

Questions

3a)  Before Jesus’s death, it was not possible to be free from the Law (that is why God’s people lived under the law).  Now, after Jesus’s sacrifice we are free from the Law and under no condemnation or death and are saved.

Condemnation according to Zondervan’s Illustrated Bible Dictionary describes the judgment against someone or treating a person as guilty.  It could also refer to the specific penalty for the guilt.

In this passage, Christ made salvation possible by bearing the sin of men and women, because thus he “condemned sin” (Romans 8:3); that is, he showed the guilt of sin and bore its consequences, so that “there is now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus.” (Romans 8:1)

b)  Personal Question I could do without.  My answer:  It doesn’t.  The only changes are the ones I constantly pray/ask for:  to make me more like Jesus.  To catch my shortcomings/sins before they happen.  To not judge or condemn others quickly.  I know I am free and harbor no guilt.

4)  God sent Jesus who brought the Holy Spirit to us to guide us.  God was in charge of sending His Son to save us forever from our sins and implant the Holy Spirit in our hearts to be our guide.

5)  We fulfill the righteous requirements by being washed in the blood of Jesus.  The how is accepting Jesus as our eternal sacrifice.  The Holy Spirit serves as our guide in obedience to God’s “laws” (way we should behave).

Conclusions: Paul finally goes into the Great Hope:  our life now with Jesus as our Savior!  Such a gift God has given us all with the Holy Spirit.  So amazing!

End Notes: Since God the Father does not condemn Jesus, neither can the Father condemn those who are in Jesus. They are not condemned, they will not be condemned, and they cannot be condemned.

The “Therefore” is Paul proving his argument logically.

“In Christ”:  Christ is in believers by His Spirit, and believers are in Christ by faith.

If you are not in Christ, then you are condemned.

Romans 8 is the peace from the conflict of Romans 7.

We are free from the guilt and power of sin.

Paul uses the word “law” in several different ways in Romans.  Here, it means controlling power.  God’s law (Romans 2:17-20; 9:31; 10:3-5).  The Pentateuch (Romans 3:21).  The Old Testament as a whole (Romans 3:19).  Principle (Romans 3:27).

The law guides us and teaches us and we obey out of love of God and by the power of the Holy Spirit, but it can never please God nor sanctify us.

Manson said, “Moses’ law has right but not might; sin’s law has might but not right; the law of the Spirit has both right and might.”

The law detects sin; Jesus defeats sin.  The law is weak because of human nature.  Hence, Jesus came “in the likeness of” meaning Jesus can’t be sin in order to defeat sin.  Jesus was righteous and since we are in Jesus we hence are righteous as well.  Jesus is our substitute.

Those who walk according to the Spirit means their life is directed by the Holy Spirit in continued and progressive motion.  Obedience is on display, not rebellion.  The flesh is always present, but it is powerless.

Fun Fact:  Romans 8 begins with no condemnation; it ends with no separation, and in between there is no defeat

BSF Study Questions Romans Lesson 12, Day 5: Romans 7:21-25

Summary of passage:  Man’s nature cannot help but sin (a war between the mind and the body/flesh) and be a slave to sin.  But through Jesus Christ we are rescued from sin’s power.

Questions:

11)  He’s very distressed.  He feels powerless (“wretched”), desperate, and overwhelmed like we all do at times at his inability to overcome sin.  He probably feels tired from the constant battle of mind and flesh.  We should feel the same: crying out against our self and unto God.

12a)  Jesus is the answer.

b)  As we’ve discussed in depth this week, the law pushes us to sin more as it’s our desire to break rules.  Jesus is the only one who has the power to overcome our nature.  Otherwise, under our own power, we are helpless to live in sin.

13)  Personal Question.  My answer:  Sin is always in my life and I feel like all my prayers to overcome sin are desperate.  I perpetually pray to have less of a temper and to soften my words towards others when flippant, indifferent answers arise.  The prayer is simple:  Jesus, give me your power to overcome sin.  I need you.  Come and fill me and let the Holy Spirit lead the way–not me.  I can do all things THROUGH you alone.

Conclusions:  The answers to these questions are done in 5 minutes.  The in-depth study I do afterwards is hours long.  This chapter is packed with our need for Jesus.  Please take the time to dwell on what Paul is saying and to not feel helpless and overwhelmed when you sin–for as Paul states we will sin because of our nature.  Rely on Christ.  Rely on Christ.  Rely on Christ.

End Notes:  We never know how hard it is to stop sinning until we try.  C.S Lewis said, “No man knows how bad he is until he has tried to be good.”

The real self (inner self) is the one who delights in God’s law.  The impulse towards sin is a different law.

The old man is not the real Paul; the old man is dead. The flesh is not the real Paul; the flesh is destined to pass away and be resurrected. The new man is the real Paul; now Paul’s challenge is to live like God has made him.

Again, here’s the debate:  Was Paul a Christian during the experience he writes about here?  Some look at his struggle with sin and believe that it must have been before he was born again. Others believe that he is just a Christian struggling with sin. In a sense this is an irrelevant question, for this is the struggle of anyone who tries to obey God in their own strength. This experience of struggle and defeat is something that a Christian may experience, but something that a non-Christian can only experience.

Morris quoting Griffith Thomas: “The one point of the passages is that it describes a man who is trying to be good and holy by his own efforts and is beaten back every time by the power of indwelling sin; it thus refers to anyone, regenerate or unregenerate.”

Sin wins when you try to win the battle yourself.

The ancient Greek word wretched is more literally, “wretched through the exhaustion of hard labor.” Paul is completely worn out and wretched because of his unsuccessful effort to please God under the principle of Law.

Note how the great saints always speak of how bad they are, not how good.

Fun Fact:  Paul has referred to himself 40 times since Romans 7:13. In the pit of his unsuccessful struggle against sin, Paul became entirely self-focused and self-obsessed. This is the place of any believer living under law, who looks to self and personal performance rather than looking first to Jesus.

The words “Who will deliver me” show that Paul has given up on himself, and asks “Who will deliver me?” instead of “How will I deliver myself?”

“Body of death” is figurative for body of sin (6:6; 8:10) that hung on Paul like a corpse and from which he could not gain freedom.

Some commentators see a reference to ancient kings who tormented their prisoners by shackling them to decomposing corpses. Paul longed to be free from the wretched body of death clinging to him.

“It was the custom of ancient tyrants, when they wished to put men to the most fearful punishments, to tie a dead body to them, placing the two back to back; and there was the living man, with a dead body closely strapped to him, rotting, putrid, corrupting, and this he must drag with him wherever he went. Now, this is just what the Christian has to do. He has within him the new life; he has a living and undying principle, which the Holy Spirit has put within him, but he feels that everyday he has to drag about with him this dead body, this body of death, a thing as loathsome, as hideous, as abominable to his new life, as a dead stinking carcass would be to a living man.” (Spurgeon)

“Through” means that Paul sees Jesus standing between himself and God, bridging the gap and providing the way to God.”Lord” means Paul has put Jesus in the right place – as Lord and master of his life.

The last half of verse 25 is the summary of verses 13-24.  “I myself” is the real self–the inner being that delights in God’s law (vs 22).  “Slave to law of sin” is how Christians must reckon with the enslaving power of their sinful nature as long as they live–until “the redemption of our bodies” (vs 8:23).

Jesus does not take away the struggle; he only provides the victory over sin, hate, death, and all evil as we surrender our lives to Jesus and let Him live out victory through us.

Paul shows that even though the law is glorious and good, it can’t save us – and we need a Savior. Paul never found any peace, any praising God until he looked outside of himself and beyond the law to his Savior, Jesus Christ.

The law taught us what to do, encouraged us, and told us sin was our problem.  But it couldn’t save us–only Jesus can.  He is the answer!