BSF Study Questions Revelation Lesson 21, Day 5: Romans 5:6-11; 6:23; Ephesians 2:1-10

Summary of passages:  Romans 5:6-11:  Christ died for the ungodly, demonstrating God’s ultimate love for us.  We are now justified by Christ’s blood, saved from God’s wrath, and reconciled to God through Jesus.

Romans 6:23:  “For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.”

Ephesians 2:1-10:  We were dead before Christ’s sacrifice as we followed Satan and his ways and sins, making us objects of God’s wrath.  Then God made us alive through Christ because of His love, grace, and mercy for us through faith in Jesus.

Questions:

10a)  Part personal Question.  My answer:  God has provided us His Son so that we may live forever with Him.  I’ve accepted it and honored God with my life and being.

b)  Although we were sinners and completely undeserving of grace and mercy, God sent His Son to the cross to die for our sins so that we may become righteous before God.  All God asks is faith in His Son.  Those who believe are saved.  Those who don’t believe are not saved.  That is God’s justice and mercy.

11)  Part personal Question.  My answer:  To devote your life to Him and for Him and His people.  We are to walk in the light and confess our sins and ask God to forgive us every single day.  Let His mercy flow through us and from us to others.  I will show mercy to all as Jesus did.

Conclusions:  Could have been called the “Study of Romans” for the day.  God has forgiven us permanently with His Son, Jesus Christ.  All we have to do is accept Jesus as our Savior and live for God. Simple, right?

End Notes:  Romans 5:6-11:  Jesus died for all of us, the ungodly.  The difference between righteous and good here seems to be the righteous man does not care for others but only about himself; whereas, the good man is kind and benevolent towards others.

Ephesians 2:1-10:  Paul wants us never to forget where we came from:  death and sin to life and salvation.  We should feel different being alive in Christ than when we were dead in sin.  Here, we have past, present, and future:  God loved us so much He sent His Son to make us alive in Christ and live eternally with Him forevermore.  All through faith and God’s gift to us.

God’s workmanship.  What an amazing thought!  We are God’s creation.  One Greek translation uses the word poiema which is a poem.  We are God’s poems and poems are beautiful works of art.  How cool!

Now we are to do good works out of our faith, not to earn anything.

Conclusions to Lesson 21:  I groaned most of the time doing this lesson, especially Day 4 which was a repeat of last year’s Study of the Life of Moses.  This could be called “The Study of Romans” for this week.  Not for sure how this lesson will bolster my understanding of the Book of Revelation.  This was a study of God’s character, His justice and mercy, which is prominent in all the books of the Bible.  What I want to gain out of the study of Revelation is just that:  the study of “Revelation”, the End Times, the signs I need to be on the lookout for, the coming wrath, the impending doom for the unsaved whom I may be able to help save (although God is ultimately in charge of that).

Like I said before, Revelation is only 22 chapters so BSF is stretching this study.  This is a filler lesson, plain and simple.  I just wish we could have filled it with more of in-depth study of Revelation.

BSF Study Questions Revelation Lesson 21, Day 3: Romans 1:18-32; 3:10-20

Summary of passages:  Romans 1:18-32:  God is revealing His wrath against mankind.  God’s nature has been clear since creation, giving man no excuse not to know Him.  Man chose to worship idols and so God gave man over to his sinful nature including lust and unnatural relations with one another, evil, wickedness, depravity, greed, slanderers, God-haters, etc.

Romans 3:10-20:  Paul says no one is righteous on their own.

Questions:

5a)  Part personal Question.  My answer:  The natural traits are sinful:  wickedness, idol worshipers, lustful, evil, greedy, deceitful, malicious, slanderers, God-haters, ruthless, faithless, heartless, etc.  It’s always a struggle to overcome sin and these sins pop up throughout life.

b)  God’s wrath and death because man is a sinner against God.

6)  Part personal Question.  My answer:  All sin prompts the wrath of God.  Mine would be jealousy, meanness, spiteful, vengeful, and probably every other sin.

7)  Because no one wants to think they are wrong and they have to pay consequences for their actions. People want to do whatever they want to do and are inherently selfish and ambivalent towards others.

Conclusions:  Struggled with this lesson.  Questions broad and intuitive.  Lesson 20 Day 5 led into this lesson.

End Notes:  Romans 1:18-32:  The wrath of God is not human anger.  The wrath of God is righteous and is against that which has twisted  God’s holiness.

Man has suppressed the truth of God and twisted it.  We have become fools with dark hearts.

“God gave them over” is repeated three times here.  Basically, God lets us do what we want to do–which is sin.  How tragic!  It is God’s wrath that allows us to sin, not God’s mercy or grace.

The lie is the lie that we are God.

Paul is writing this from the city of Corinth, known for its sexual immorality and pagan prostitution in the temples.  Surgeon refused to read this passage out loud, so horrible did he think the sins were.  Here is homosexuality condemned for both men and women.  Paul uses the Greek words for male and female to show just how outside human relations these acts are.

In Rome, homosexuality was rampant and most emperors and Roman citizens (those with money) used boys in this way.  The penalty will come.

“Depraved” mind used to read “reprobate” or “debased”.  It meant those that did not stand the test and were therefore rejected.

Actions and thoughts commit sins.  All deserve death.

Romans 3:10-20:  Here, Paul explains through Psalms our complete inability to save ourselves.  No one is righteous and not one seeks God–man seeks himself.  Every part of man is guilty and no one fears God.  The law cannot save man; the law only gives man the knowledge of sin.

Historical Note:  It’s interesting to see how some of the giants of theology were transformed by this passage in Romans.  Augustine, Martin Luther, John Calvin, and John Wesley all credit Romans (Paul) with their salvation and their grasp of God.