BSF Study Questions Romans Lesson 25, Day 5: Romans 13:12-14

Summary of passage:  Put aside sin (orgies, drunkenness, sexual immorality, debauchery, dissension, jealousy, etc) and put on Jesus (the armor of light).

Questions:

13)  Jesus.

14)  Personal Question.  My answer:  He is the opposite of sin and will defeat sin.  Light wins out in a dark world and always defeats it.  With Jesus all sin melts away and I can defeat it.

15)  Personal Question.  My answer:  Constant prayer, memorize Scripture, surround myself with Christian friends who can keep me accountable, put God in the center of my life, remember who this world is all about (Jesus), try to keep myself away from things that cause me to sin and places and events.

Conclusions:  Not sure we needed two days on Jesus is the light of the world.

End Notes:  [Same as yesterday’s]  Putting aside darkness (sin) and putting on light is a metaphor with putting on clothes (which we all do).  Put on Jesus (the armor of light) every morning!

Spurgeon explains this passage: “The rags of sin must come off if we put on the robe of Christ. There must be a taking away of the love of sin, there must be a renouncing of the practices and habits of sin, or else a man cannot be a Christian. It will be an idle attempt to try and wear religion as a sort of celestial overall over the top of old sins.”

The night is the present evil age.  This is a clear teaching of the nearness of the end times (1 Corinthians 7:29; Philippians 4:5; James 5:9, 1 Peter 4:7; 1 John 2:18).  Early Christians did not believe Jesus would return within a few years.  Instead, they saw the death and resurrection of Jesus as the events that began the last days (Hebrews 1:1-2).  “The night is nearly over” is the next great event in God’s plan, which is the Second Coming.  The day is when Jesus does come and ushers in the consummation of the kingdom.

The armor of light allows us to both defend and attack like in battle.

We have to work to not let sin creep into our lives since it is our nature to sin.  This is part of being present so you can stop sin in its tracks!

When we clothe ourselves with Jesus, he becomes our partner and helper and he works through us (not for us) to combat sin.

BSF Study Questions John Lesson 25, Day 5: John 19:13-17

Summary of passage:  So Pilate brings Jesus out, placing him on the judgment seat, and the people demand he die so Pilate reneges. Jesus carries his cross to Golgotha.

Questions:

12)  God’s judgment is just; Pilate’s is unjust.

13)  God’s people are to sacrifice a lamb to commemorate God’s judgment on the Egyptians and their gods and their rescue out of Egypt.  Jesus will take away the sin of the world as the Sacrificial Lamb.  It will be the ultimate judgment on unbelievers and the ultimate salvation and justification with God.

14)  Personal Question.  My answer:  There are no words.  Worshipful.  In awe.  Eternally grateful.

Conclusions:  I think there is so much more to this we could have dived into.

End Notes:  Pilate caves to political pressure.  He sits Jesus on the judgment seat who is about to judge all of mankind.  The Lamb of God is ready for sacrifice on Passover. Pilate is the one actually on trial. He refuses to free an innocent man and condemns him to death based on the crowd.

Mark and John disagree on the time here. It is possible it’s a copyist error or John may have been using Roman time, which means Jesus was before Pilate at 6 am and crucified at 9 am.

Again, it was Roman custom to carry the crosspiece to the place of execution.

BSF Study Questions John Lesson 25, Day 4: John 18:38-19:17

Summary of passage:  Pilate declares Jesus innocent and offers to release him as is the Jewish custom of Passover.  The Jews instead demand a rebel, Barabbas.  So Jesus was flogged and beaten and mocked.  Pilate again says Jesus is innocent.  The Jews again demand to crucify him and accuse him of disobeying their law.  Afraid of an uprising, Pilate questions Jesus again, probably looking for more reasons to set him free.  Jesus refuses to answer, saying all the power Pilate has over him is from God.

Still, Pilate tried to set Jesus free but the Jews kept insisting he die.  Finally, the Jews said Jesus is violating Roman law by claiming to be a king over Caesar.  So Pilate brings Jesus out and the people demand he die so Pilate reneges.  Jesus carries his cross to Golgotha.

Questions:

9)  Pilate ignores the truth in front of him.  Jesus explains how God is the one who has given him power over him.  Pilate chose instead to look out for himself.  He was afraid he’d lose his position.

10)  He ultimately condemns a man he knows to be innocent to death.  He’s afraid of a Jewish uprising.  He’s afraid he’ll lose his position.

11)  Personal Question.  My answer:  Many.  Unquestioningly.

Conclusions:  Not the best questions.  We all know Pilate was a coward and caved to political pressure.  Obeying God is our job.

End Notes:  Knowing Jesus was innocent, Pilate offers to release him, calling Jesus the King of the Jews in hopes of appealing to them.  The crowd condemns Jesus as Matthew tells us at the prompting of the religious leaders (Matthew 27:20; Mark 15:11).  The name Barabbas sounds like son of the father.  The people chose the antichrist instead, a choice that is still being made every day when Jesus is rejected.

Barabbas was probably involved in the local resistance movement against the Romans and would have been viewed as a hero.  He was accused of at least three crimes: Theft (John 18:40), insurrection (Mark 15:7), and murder (Mark 15:7).

Pilate ordered Jesus to be scourged.  Most think Pilate was trying to help Jesus–that this act would satisfy the crowd.  Scourging like crucifixion was a Roman practice.  It involved a whip (picture HERE) with many leather strands, each having sharp pieces of bone or metal at the ends, pummeling the back, redoing it to raw flesh.  Many died from its use.

Scourging had three purposes. It was used to punish prisoners, and to gain confessions of crimes from prisoners. Also, in cases of crucifixion scourging was used to weaken the victim so he would die more quickly on the cross.

Jesus was humiliated and mocked.  The crown of thorns cut into his head and purple was reserved only for royalty.

As a judge Pilate had both reason and responsibility to set Jesus free with no punishment instead of the humiliation and brutality that He endured.  Pilate made five attempts to release Jesus (Luke 23:4, 15, 20, 22; John 19:4, 12, 13).

Whatever pity the crowd might have had was drowned out when the religious leaders shouted:  “Crucify!”  Pure hatred this was plain and simple.

The Jews finally admitted they wanted Jesus dead because he claimed to be God.  Pilate was afraid because he did see something in Jesus.  The Romans believed their gods came to earth in human guise all the time.  Pilate probably did believe Jesus was some sort of divine being.

Pilate questions Jesus more, hoping for something to set him free.  Unfortunately, he asks Jesus the same questions he already answers so Jesus says nothing more.

Pilate is angry Jesus won’t beg for his life or answer someone as important as him.  Pilate claims to have power but he’s at the mercy of the religious leaders and the crowd.  Jesus tells him God is in charge and there are others more guilty than you.  These are Jesus’ last words to Pilate.

Pilate panics.  His wife had told him she dreamed Jesus should be set free (Matthew 27:19-20); yet he caves to the crowd.  Pilate was a weak, unremarkable man who only had his position because he married the granddaughter of the emperor. He was scared his position would suffer if he set Jesus free.

The Lamb of God is ready for sacrifice on Passover.  Pilate is the one actually on trial.  He refuses to free an innocent man and condemns him to death.

Mark and John disagree on the time here.  It is possible it’s a copyist error or John may have been using Roman time, which means Jesus was before Pilate at 6 am and crucified at 9 am.

Again, it was Roman custom to carry the crosspiece to the place of execution.

BSF Study Questions John Lesson 25, Day 2: John 18:28-32

Summary of passage:  Jesus was taken to Pontius Pilate’s house and addressed outside so his Jewish captors could remain clean.  They took him there to be tried under Roman law because Roman law allowed executions.

Questions:

3)  They would become unclean if they entered Pilate’s palace and they wanted to eat the Passover meal.  More concerned about food than the life of a man.  Hypocrites.

4)  Jewish law does not allow executions but Roman law does.  Pilate tried to have the Jews try him.  He will be crucified and flogged.

5)  Personal Question.  My answer:  I’m not one for excuses and I try to do what is right.

Conclusions:  We’re marching along with Jesus to his death and are seeing everything people will do to kill him–doing things they normally wouldn’t do probably.  The sad thing is man hasn’t changed.

End Notes:  John leaves out how Jesus was first presented before the council recorded in Matthew 26:57-68 and the official, daylight meeting of the Sanhedrin in Luke 22:66.  Thus, the Jews have condemned Jesus to death and now need the Romans to carry it out.

The palace or praetorium was likely at the Roman Fortress Antonia, where Pilate held court and conducted public business.  It was the commander’s headquarters.  The word is better translated judgment hall.  Palace is a misnomer.

We see the hypocrisy here as the Jews refused to break relatively small commands regarding ceremonial defilement, but broke much greater commands in rejecting God’s Messiah and condemning an innocent man to death.  The law stated they couldn’t come into contact with unclean Gentiles or enter an unclean home with leaven.

“Eat the Passover”:  This statement introduces a controversy, namely this – was the Last Supper a Passover meal, and was Jesus crucified on the Passover or the day following? This statement in John 18:28 seems to indicate that Passover was the coming day, the day Jesus would be crucified and that the Last Supper was the day before Passover. Yet several passages seem to indicate that the Last Supper was a Passover meal (Matthew 26:18, Mark 14:12, 14:16, Luke 22:15). The best solution to this difficult chronological problem seems to be that Jesus was crucified on the Passover, and the meal they had the night before was as Passover meal, held after sunset (the start of the day in Jewish reckoning). We can speculate that Passover lambs were sacrificed on both days, a necessity due to the massive number of lambs sacrificed in Jerusalem at the temple on Passover (later described by Josephus as being more than 200,000).–Taken from enduringword.com

It was early, perhaps before 6 am and we see Pilate’s irritation.  The religious leaders did not expect objections from Pilate.  He was a ruthless man, known for his corruption, his acts of insolence, his rapine, his habit of insulting people, his cruelty, his continual murders of people untried and uncondemned, and his never-ending gratuitous and most grievous inhumanity.  The Jews are evasive cause they know the charges are trumped up and false.  Luke 23:2 does have a more specific answer.

Josephus tells us, that it was not lawful to hold a court of judgment in capital cases, without the consent of the Procurator.  Besides, Jewish law allowed for death by stoning.  Only the Romans could crucify.

The Jews were the ones who wanted Jesus dead.  He wasn’t really on the radar as an enemy of Rome.  The Jews were the ones who made him so.  Tragic.

Who was Pontius Pilate?  Pilate was the Roman procurator or regional ruler for Judea at the time of Jesus’ death from 26-36 AD.  His early life is unknown and most of what we know before Jesus is speculation like how he came to be governor.  Some say it was punishment.  Others say it was political connections.  Governors were mainly in charge of tax and financial matters but because Judea was so difficult and troublesome a province the governor there answered directly to the emperor and had authority over judicial matters as well.

Most governors hated being posted to so distant a post but Pilate seems to enjoy it.  He was cruel to them as he tried to force Rome upon them.  Pilate was in Jeruasalem to keep the peace during Passover.  He was staying at Herod’s Palace near the temple.  He didn’t want to offend the Jews nor condemn an innocent man so he kept trying to get Jesus set free.  Eventually, he succumbed to politics and sentenced Jesus to death.

Judea was a source of turmoil as the Jews hated Rome.  He didn’t want to deal with Jesus and tried sending him to Herod instead.  He asked, “What is truth?” and didn’t see truth right in front of him.

He condemned Jesus to be rid of him and keep the peace between Rome and the Jews.  Pilate would be out of power a few years later for massacring Samaritans and after that he disappears from history with only unsubstantiated claims he killed himself.

BSF Study Questions Revelation Lesson 25, Day 4: Revelation 20: 7-10

Summary of passage:  After the 1000 years, Satan will be released and will go out to deceive the nations and gather Gog and Magog for battle.  There will be a huge number of them.  God however threw fire down from heaven to destroy them and threw the devil into the lake of burning sulfur to be tormented for eternity.

Questions:

9a)  Part personal Question.  My answer:  He goes out to deceive the nations.  He’s evil, pure and simple.  Man is evil, pure and simple.

b)  God wins.  God destroys all of Satan’s followers and throws Satan into the lake of burning sulfur for eternity.

10a)  Personal Question.  My answer:  It doesn’t astonish me.  It doesn’t.

b)  They prefer to sin.

c)  Personal Question.  My answer:  Pray.  Know God’s word.  Count on God to get me through the day and all the temptations of the world for he doesn’t give me more than I can handle and He always provides a way out (1 Corinthians 10:13).

Conclusions:  Flabbergasted to tell you the truth.  Nothing here worthy of mentioning.  No substance.  Nothing on God and Magog.  Stunned.  My kids are bored with this study and I have started to let them skip classes.  And I am counting down the lessons.  Sad for me.  Truly sad.

Suffering and death is what we deserve.  Hence, Satan’s actions upon the world don’t “astonish” me or anything else.  I follow God.  I tell others.  I don’t worry (Phillippians 4:6).  The rest is up to God.

End Notes:  Why would anyone after 1000 years with Jesus and peace rebel again?  God allows it to show just how corrupt man is.  During Jesus’ reign, people will go through the motions and never have a heart for Jesus.  This will show when Satan returns and gathers too many to count.  Sad.  Very, very sad.

This is the last rebellion before the final judgment.

There will be no one to blame but our own sinful, depraved nature.  In a perfect world, man is not perfect.  Can’t blame your parents, your school, your socioeconomic condition, where you were born, etc.  All will be your responsibility.  And God wants to make that abundantly clear.

The angel is NOT Jesus.  It would say “Jesus” here if it were.  The key represents authority so we can assume Jesus has given the key to the angel to administer his justice.

The rebels will be the children of those who survived the Great Tribulation and live during the Millennium.  Even though Jesus rules because of Free Will all these children will need to accept Christ.  Man must overcome his sinful nature as always.  This could potentially number in the billions once again (“the sand on the seashore”).  If you think of how many survive the Tribulation and they all procreate for 1000 years, that’s a lot.

Who/What are Gog and Magog?  They appear in Ezekiel 38-39 and represent an evil empire that attacks Israel from the north.  Gog is the prince and Magog is the land of Gog, probably in Asia Minor.  Many have tried to identify them as a specific country such as Nazi Germany or the Soviet Union.  THIS GOG AND MAGOG HERE IS NOT THE SAME AS THE GOG AND MAGOG IN EZEKIEL.  Here, the Bible tells us they are the nations in the four corners of the earth.  In this passage Gog and Magog represent all enemy nations against God and His people.  They are evil personified.  Here are used as symbols for the participants in the final battle with evil.

Best concise explanation of God and Magog with the comparison to Ezekiel HERE

We’ve seen the gathering of kings and beasts against God’s people before (Revelation 19:19: 16:14-16).  And just as before they will be defeated.

God’s people here could be the saints ruling with Jesus from the Tribulation or earth’s inhabitants who have a true heart from Jesus that are alive during the 1000 years.

“The city he loves” is Jerusalem.

Again, we see no battle like in the battle of Armageddon in Revelation 16.  God just wipes out all with heavenly fire.  They will await final judgment at the Great White Throne room in Revelation 20:11-15.

We have Satan, the beast (Antichrist), and the false prophet in the lake of burning sulfur forever (Revelation 19:20).  Jesus speaks of this as well in Matthew 25:41. God is good!

What is hell like?  Here we have some answers in this passage:

  1.  It’s eternal, “forever and ever”.  We see this used to describe the throne of Christ (Hebrews 1:8).  So hell is unending as Christ is unending.
  2. It’s a place of eternal torment. There is no hope, forgiveness, or clemency.
  3. Unbelievers will be cast into the eternal lake of burning sulfur along with Satan and the unrepentant angels.  We see two humans (Antichrist and the false prophet) cast into the lake of fire before Satan (Revelation 19:19-20).

BSF Study Questions Revelation Lesson 25, Day 3: Revelation 20:4-6

Summary of passage:  John sees thrones where those given authority to judge are seated.  He sees the souls of the martyrs who died for Jesus alive and reigning for 1000 years during the first resurrection.  The rest did not come to life.  Blessed are these.

Questions:

6a)  “Because of their testimony for Jesus and because of the word of God.”  They were raised from the dead and reigned with Christ for 1000 years.

b)  Personal Question that I’m tired of answering:  It doesn’t.

See Lesson 16 Day 4 for repetition.

7a)  Risen from the dead and all believers will share in it.

b)  The second death.

8 )  Priests of God and of Christ and will reign with him for a thousand years.  Everything.

Conclusions:  Rich passage.  Strike out the personal questions and add more interpretation especially with the different deaths and resurrections.  This was VERY confusing to me and only after I researched it did I have an idea what John was talking about.  Perhaps the notes will address this but I need to understand NOW not after the lecture.

End Notes:  This passage fulfills Revelation 2:10-11.

Who is sitting on these thrones?  Possibilities:  the twenty-four elders representing the church (Revelation 4:4) or the apostles (Matthew 19:28) or the company of saints as a whole (1 Corinthians 6:2-3).

“Those given authority to judge” are all those who had been redeemed by His blood, resurrected from the grave, and raptured into His presence. These (the saints) will reign as kings and priests with Christ (Revelation 1:5-6; 5:9-10).  Note they reign for the same amount of time Satan is bound.

These beheaded (executed in ancient Greek) ones are the souls we saw under the altar in Revelation 6:9.  More have been added (Revelation 6:11) during the Tribulation.  In essence, all will reign (Revelation 2:26-28, 3:12,22; 1 Corinthians 6:2-3) but the martyrs here are encouraged and specified for all they have suffered.

Scholars debate if this is a bodily resurrection or not.  Some point to Ezekiel 37:12-14 where a nation is described as being resurrected and to Isaiah 26:19 where he is speaking figuratively after Babylon of victory.

The “rest of the dead” are the unbelievers who did not take part in the “first resurrection” with the redeemed and did not accept Jesus as Savior.
“And many of those who sleep in the dust of the earth shall awake, some to everlasting life, some to shame and everlasting contempt” (Daniel 12:2)
The “first resurrection” refers to the resurrection of the redeemed.  It includes: resurrection of Christ (1 Cor. 15:23; Revelation 1:5), resurrection of the church (the dead in Christ – 1 Cor. 15:23; 1 Thess. 4:16); and resurrection of Old Testament and Tribulation saints (Revelation 20:4; Isaiah 26:19; Dan. 12:2). The rest of the dead (unbelievers) will be raised in the second resurrection (Revelation 20:12-13).

The second death, which is referred to in Revelation 20:14-15, is a spiritual death.

In essence, those who suffered death by martyrdom will not suffer spiritual death.  They are promised the first resurrection.  Those who didn’t suffer death by martyrdom will face the second or spiritual death and their resurrection (the second) will be seen in the White Throne room in verses 11-15.

The Bible discusses two “deaths” and two “resurrections”.

The “first death” is the death of the body (Hebrews 9:27).  The “second death” is the eternal death and suffering that only affects unbelievers.  (v.14).  This explains John’s words in verse 6.

There are two “resurrections.”   The word “resurrection” is a Greek word meaning “to make to stand” or “rise up.”  This occurs when the soul reenters the body after the physical death and rises up.  All resurrect because all die.

Believers take part in the “first resurrection” and acquire a new body in the process (Phil.3:20-21; 1 Cor.15:52).  Scholars debate whether the first resurrection will have many parts beginning with Jesus and encompassing the Tribulation martyrs amongst others  (Matt.27:53; 1 Thess.4:16-17; Rev.11:11).  This depends on when you believe the rapture will occur.  Pretribulationists believe it will be in many parts.  Posttribulationists believe it will be one event.
Unbelievers not in Christ take part in the “second resurrection”.   They do not receive a new body and this occurs one time after the Millennium, which explains verse 5.

In John 5:28-29, Jesus mentions these 2 resurrections.  The 2 are separated by 1000 years as believers are raised first and then non-believers.

We see the Fifth Beatitude in verse 6.

BSF Study Questions Matthew Lesson 25, Day 3: Matthew 14-30

Summary of passage:  Jesus tells his disciples another parable.  A master decides to go on a journey so he calls his servants and gives each some property to them.  One servant receives 5 talents, another 2, and another just 1. The man who had received the 5 talents went out and put his talents to work so that he gained 5 more.  The one who received 2 talents went out and gained 2 more as well.  But the man who had only received 1 talent went off and buried his under a tree.

The master returned and settled accounts with his servants.  Because the one with 5 talents had doubled his, the master praised him and put him in charge of many more things.  The same with the man who had doubled his 2 talents.  The one who had received the 1 talent was chastised by the master.  He had his talent stripped from him and given to the man with 10 talents now.

Everyone who has more will be given more.  Those who do not have will have even what they have taken from them and be thrown into the darkness.

Questions:

6a)  Proverbs 3:13-15:  Finding wisdom and gaining understanding or knowledge.  You will be more profitable and will yield more.

Matthew 13:52:  Learn about the kingdom of heaven

Matthew 28:19-20:  Go and make disciples of all nation, baptizing them in the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit and teaching them to obey everything God commands.

John 1:9-13:  Light, knowing Jesus and God, and believing in Jesus and God.

John 13:15:  Following Jesus’ example–doing what he has done for us.

John 21:15-17:  Feed Jesus’ sheep and care for them out of love of Christ.

2 Timothy 3:16-17:  Scripture that is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting, and training in righteousness to be equipped for good work.

In essence, we are responsible for knowing Him and telling others about him.

b)  Personal Question.  My answer:  He has entrusted my children to me that I am to teach and train up in Him.  He has given me a talent/passion for writing that I am trying to use for His glory.  He has given me a passion for His word so that I may share my knowledge with others.  He has given me a husband to care for as well and share my knowledge with.

7)  Five Talent:  He went immediately out and put his money to work and gained five more.  He was rewarded by being put in charge of many things and sharing in his master’s happiness.  He was apparently hard-working, enthusiastic, and obedient.  He was good and faithful.

Two Talent:  He gained 2 more talents as well and was rewarded with more things and happiness.  He was obedient as well, good and faithful.

One Talent:  He buried his money in a hole, afraid of his master.  He had the one talent taken from him and given to the man with 5 talents and he was thrown outside into the darkness with weeping and gnashing of teeth.  He was “wicked and lazy”.

8a)  We are told he was afraid of his master.  He was overly cautious, not wanting to risk anything or lose the 1 talent given him.

b)  God will repay you for the years lost and bless you.  You will have plenty to eat and will be full.  You will praise God for these wonders in your life and know He is God.  You will never be shamed again.

c)  Personal Question.  My answer:  In all honesty, no, I can’t.  I can’t think of a time I have hidden my talent and then brought it out, used it, and was rewarded for it.  I like to think I’m authentic and what you see is what you get.  I try not to hide anything nor deceive.  I’m not one to be frightened of consequences if I am following God’s will.  There were times as a child where I was shy but no specifics jump out at me.  I think I’m still searching in all honesty for my talent to be discovered.

9)  “For everyone who has will be given more, and he will have an abundance.  Whoever does not have, even what he has will be taken from him.”  God gives you things.  If you use these gifts, more will be given to you.  If you don’t, all will be taken away.

Conclusions:  Another dousy of a lesson with lots of verses to look up for the second day in a row!  This is about using our gifts that God has given us for Him and not for us.  And when we do that, we will be entrusted with more to use for His kingdom.  Great lesson worth the extra time involved!

End Notes:  In today’s terms, a talent would be worth close to $1500 and maybe much more.  The talent was a weight so the worth of a talent would depend on if it were made of gold, silver, or copper.  Most scholars estimate it at around 6,000 denarii or about what a day laborer would earn in 20 years!

In Greek, the word is a money denomination but we do derive our English word “talent” from this parable by Jesus (neat, huh?).  The meaning has evolved to take on more than as a unit of currency.  Now it can stand for extraordinary ability or natural aptitude or skill.

The servants were given money according to their ability but each was given some and still a significant amount.  Everyone received something and it is only man’s pride and envy that produces jealously over the gifts instead of being grateful for what their gift is.

The first and second servant took action and did something with their talents.  The third did nothing.

Note the master returned after a long time.  We will give account and we are called to remain faithful no matter how long our lives are.

Other Bible translations have “happiness” as “joy of your lord.”  From that sense it is clear Jesus is referring to heaven with God.

The third servant’s attitude is:  because the master was so great, he was unneeded so he therefore did nothing. At least he gave back to the master what was his.  So often today people think gifts from God are theirs, it belongs to them, and they can do what they want.  This man is full of excuses.  Some people today even blame God for their failures.

Note the strong condemnation against laziness.  It is a sin when you are not working for the Lord.  He accepts no excuses.

The man could have at least put the money in a bank.  This would be similar to helping others do the Lord’s work if you refuse to do the work assigned to you.  But he didn’t.  Therefore, he was not of the Lord nor of a heart of Jesus so he was cast to Hell.

Here Jesus is saying:  Each person in the kingdom of heaven is given a certain number of gifts and opportunities (talents) to serve God.  We can either waste those opportunities or invest them in a way that furthers the kingdom.

We must be ready for Jesus’ return.  One way is to use what he has given us wisely.  We must be about the Lord’s business, not ours.  What have you done with your money, knowledge, talents, time, and abilities?  Sometimes it’s about what we don’t do instead of what we do do.