BSF Study Questions John Lesson 24, Day 2: John 18:1-27

Summary of passage:  Jesus and his disciples left the upper room, crossed the Kidron Valley, and stopped in an olive grove.  Judas shows up with officials and soldiers armed with weapons.  They ask for Jesus who declares himself.  Peter drew his sword to defend Jesus and cut off the ear of a servant named Malchus.  Jesus chastises Peter, telling him this is his destiny.

Jesus was arrested and taken to Annas, Caiaphas’ father-in-law.  Peter and John followed Jesus.  John went with Jesus while Peter waited outside.  When asked by a little girl if he was one of the disciples, Peter denies Jesus for the first time.

Annas questions Jesus who is struck by a soldier.  He’s shipped off to Caiaphas.  Meanwhile, Peter denies Jesus a second and third time.  A rooster crows.

Questions:

3)  Part personal Question.  My answer:  Jesus does not hide.  He admits who he is.  He answers truthfully questions put to him.  He does not lie to save his skin.  He goes to the garden knowing he will be arrested when he could have ran and hid.  It’s inspiring to do the work God has for me like Jesus did God’s work for him.

4)  He knew he would be arrested that night and he still went anyways.  He admits who he is.  He dies so not one of us will be lost.  He tells Peter not to fight for him.  He denies nothing to Annas about who he is or what he said.  He willingly takes the hits and the punches and eventually his death for us.

5)  Part personal Question.  My answer:  He never shrinks from any of this.  He accepts his fate and goes out with dignity and self-respect.  He never denies who he is.  He willingly takes all of our sin on him and suffers.  My sufferings pale in comparison.  I remember what Jesus did for me and live for him every day.

Conclusions:  Major focus today on Jesus’ demeanor during his arrest and how that strengthens us.  We are spending all week on this passage so we’ll probably break it down further.  No fear in the face of God’s plan.  Perfect!

End Notes:  The Kidron was a small stream that was the drainage from the temple, and would be reddish from the blood of thousands of Passover lambs.  This would have been a vivid reminder to Jesus of His soon sacrifice.  Info on Valley HERE  Cool Maps of Jesus’ last 24 hours and his movements HERE and HERE

John did not name this as the Garden of Gethsemane, but the other Gospel writers did (Matthew 26:36 and Mark 14:32). Jesus often met there with His disciples, perhaps to sleep for the night under the shelter of the olive trees or in a nearby cave.  Hence, why Judas knew Jesus would be there that night and why Jesus went–so Judas could easily find him knowing he was searching for him.

John does not go into detail in the Garden, leaving that to the other apostles to do so.

Judas came with many soldiers, expecting a struggle.  How he didn’t know our Lord!  Jesus could have wiped them out with a word.  This harkens to the Garden of Eden.  Man lost that round.  He would win this round!

Jesus speaks first for 2 reasons:  1)  He wanted any potential violence to be directed to Him and not to His disciples.   2)  Jesus wanted Judas and the detachment of troops to announce their evil intention.

IMPORTANT NOTE:  I am: Jesus answered them with two words in both English and in the Greek (ego eimi). He did not say, “I am he”–that was added by translators and not in the original text.  Jesus was consciously proclaiming himself God, just like he did throughout his testimony on earth (John 8:58; 6:48, 8:12, 9:5, 10:9, 10:11-14, 10:36, 11:25, 14:6).

This explains why all fell back.  When Jesus proclaims himself “I am” the power and presence of God overwhelms the soldiers and they are afraid.  We’re talking probably upwards of 500 soldiers sent to arrest Jesus and all were petrified.  Jesus could have escaped then, but he didn’t.  For our sakes.

Jesus asks them again who he is in order to shock them back to reality.  He repeats I am but with less force.  He willingly gives himself up and asks for his disciples to go free.  Sacrificial love.  The show of power was to protect them as well.  This was a command to let them go.  He promised the Father he would protect them (John 17:12).  There would be no harm to his disciples as long as Jesus was there!  This was also the signal for the disciples to slip away, which they did all except Peter and John.

John is the only writer to identify Peter as the one with the sword.  Peter was fulfilling his promise to protect Jesus (Matthew 26:35).

Cutting off the right ear is significant.  Scholars say this meant Peter, holding the sword in his right hand, must have attacked the high priest’s servant from behind, because it would be near impossible to cut off his right ear if he was facing the servant Malchus. It is entirely possible that Peter deliberately chose a non-solider, and attacked him from behind. This was not a shining display of courage.  And given the fact we know Peter is about to deny Jesus 3 times, this was probably an impulsive display that was safe for him.

Why is the servant mentioned by name here?  Scholars speculate that Malchus may have eventually become a Christian and would have been known to the early Christian community at the time of this writing.  This is a pattern we see throughout the rest of the Gospels and Acts.

Peter’s thoughtless action may have erupted into violence and the disciples getting hurt.  Jesus stops Peter for his own good and for the disciples.  And so he could die on the cross.  John leaves out how Jesus healed the man’s ear (Luke 22:51).

The cup signifies suffering and the wrath of God.  It came from the Father.  God is in control.

The captain was a Roman and the others were Jews.  Both were complicit in Jesus’ death.  Jesus consented to be bound.  He could break those easily.

Annas was the power behind the throne in Jerusalem. He himself had been High Priest from AD 6 to 15. Four of his sons had also held the high priesthood and Caiaphas was his son-in-law.  His name meant “Yahweh is gracious”.  He is still called the high priest in Acts 4:6 when Peter and John are arrested.

One reason John reminds us of what Caiaphas said in John 11:49-52 is to show that the judgment against Jesus was already decided. It would not be a fair trial.  He would die for the people.

John who had the connections is the reason they had access to the high priest’s house and the reason we know what went on there.

A mere girl scares Peter enough to deny Christ and then he tries to blend into the crowd and shrink himself by standing around a fire with others.  How tragic!

Jesus was not going to throw his disciples under the bus.  He never mentions them.  He asks for evidence in asking for others to testify to his words.  This should have been the first step Annas should have taken for one accused of crimes.  But there would be no fairness here for Jesus.  He was a threat that had to be annihilated.

The first blow is laid upon Jesus be an unnamed official.  Jesus calls the man out and having no answer, Annas sends Jesus on, still bound.

Luke 22:61 indicates that Peter could see Jesus and see him being slapped.  No doubt his fear increased and he lied twice more.  John is also present and Peter lied in front of John. The same question is asked in the same way, using the negative.  The questioners expected the answer “No”, not expecting a follower of Jesus amongst them.  The questioner is identified differently in all  Gospels (Matthew 26:71; Mark 14:69; Luke 22:58).

John would know Malchus’ relative and a relative would be eager to know if this was the man who cut off his relative’s ear.  Matthew 26:74 tells us Peter cursed this denial.  He was adamant and he was a coward.

The rooster crowing fulfilled what Jesus said in John 13:38, and would have immediately reminded Peter of the prediction Jesus made in the upper room.  And I would imagine shame would have flooded Peter.

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BSF Study Questions Revelation Lesson 24, Day 2: Revelation 19:1-5

Summary of passage:  Nothing new here.  The roar of the great multitude praised God’s glory and power and salvation and His just judgments against the great prostitute.  The servants’ blood has been avenged by the burning city and the 24 elders and 4 living creatures fell down and worshiped God.

Questions:

3)  Part personal Question.  My answer:  Salvation, glory, and power.  Salvation means eternal life with God.  Glory is God’s amazing holiness and justice.  Power is God’s control over the universe.

4)  Personal Question.  My answer:  God’s justice, truth, power, glory, and salvation.  Salvation for I am forgiven and promised a place in heaven by God’s side for all of eternity.

We’ve been asked about God’s attributes as well before:  Lesson 2 Day 4, Lesson 14 Day 3

5a)  Salvation, justice, and permanence (the city of Babylon has been destroyed and it will never rise again).

b)  Personal Question.  My answer:  We’ve been asked this before (Lesson 2 Day 4, Lesson 3 Day 5, Lesson 9 Day 2 & Day 5, Lesson 10 Day 5, Lesson 14 Day 3, Lesson 16 Day 4 .  It doesn’t do either of those listed.  My worship stays the same.

Conclusions:  All personal application questions.  Like I said in my summary, no new information here.  It’s a repetition of what we’ve just seen in heaven.  John is summarizing.  This day’s questions should have been combined with the third day’s.  Weak lesson.

End Notes:  In Revelation 18 the inhabitants of the world mourned Babylon’s fall.  Here, God’s people celebrate it.  We see heaven rejoicing throughout the book of Revelation for Christ’s return and God’s culmination of His plan for mankind happening or about to happen (Revelation 4, 5, 7, 11, 15, 16).

We saw the great multitude in Revelation 7:9-14 who came out of the great tribulation.  It was in Revelation 6:10 where the martyred saints cried out for justice and here we see that prayer answered.  Revelation 4 is where we met the 24 elders and the 4 living creatures.

Fun Fact:  Hallelujah appears 4 times here in Revelation 19 but no where else in the New Testament.  Hallelujah is a two-word transliteration of the Hebrew phrase for “Praise the Lord”.  It is found 24 times in the book of Psalm.

In verse 5 the “voice from the throne” could be Jesus but more likely is one of the attending angels at God’s throne.  The words the voice speaks is from Psalm 113:1; 115:13.

Similar language in terms of speaking of the End Times judgement:  Isaiah 34:10 and Deuteronomy 32:43.

BSF Study Questions Genesis Lesson 24, Day 2: Genesis 32:1-8 and 2 Kings 6:8-23

Summary of passages:  Jacob leaves Mesopotamia and heads for the Promised Land. On the way, he sees angels of God who meet him and camp beside him.  He sends messengers ahead to tell Esau that he is coming.  He calls himself Esau’s servant and asks to find favor in his eyes.

The messengers return, telling Jacob that Esau is coming to meet along with 400 men. Jacob is afraid and assumes Esau will attack him so he divides his band into 2 groups in hopes if one is attacked the other group will survive.

2 Kings 6:8-23:  Aram and Israel are at war.  A man of God (Elisha the prophet) tells Israel’s king exactly what the king of Aram is planning.  This enraged the king of Aram. He accuses his officers of warning the Israelites but they tell him it is Elisha.  So the king of Aram tries to capture Elisha in Dothan.  They surround the city.

Elisha’s servant who is afraid warns Elisha.  Elisha prays and the Lord opens the servant’s eyes to see horses and chariots of fire all around (the supernatural forces of God around us).

The Elisha prays and Aram’s forces are struck with blindness.  Elisha then leads Aram’s forces to Samaria.  He prays for their eyes to be opened and the Lord does so.  The king of Israel asks Elisha if he should kill them.  Elisha responds no but instead feed and water them and send them back home.

The king of Israel prepared a great feast for his enemies and they returned home and stopped raiding Israel.

Questions:

3a)  God is with us even when we can’t see him.  If you treat your enemies humbly and serve them, God will bless you.  Jacob humbled himself before Esau, calling himself his servant (when we all know the prophecy states otherwise) and Elisha feeds the enemy with a grand feast and sends them home.

b)  Personal Question.  My answer:  Treat even those whom we don’t like as we would want to be treated.  Remember God is all around us.  His forces surround us, protecting us from the devil even though we cannot see them.  If we call upon them, they will fight for us.  Something we need to remember.

4a)  Genesis 32:1-2:  God sends his angels to help us.  We can see angels.

Psalm 34:7:  Angels protect those who fear the Lord and delivers them.

Daniel 6:22:  Angels do God’s bidding.  Here, they shut the mouths of the lions to protect Daniel who was innocent before God.

1 Corinthians 6:2-3:  Since the saints (us) will judge the world we will judge angels as well (since we are above angels.  See Hebrews 1:4-14).

Hebrews 1:14:  Angels are ministering spirits sent to serve us.

b)  Personal Question.  My answer:  Angels serve us and help us.  Good to know there are others sent to back me up in the spiritual battles I face.

Conclusions:  Mixed on this lesson actually.  It seems like every year we have a study of angels so I guess this was it.  I liked the 2 Kings passage.  It’s a great reminder that God is all around us, watching and helping us, even if we can’t see it, and He has sent helpers (angels) for our benefit.  And a reminder to treat our enemies kindly.  Then we will be blessed.

I would, however, like to see the camp of angels around me.  Cool, huh?

One interesting note:  Even though Jacob can see the angels around him, he quickly forgets God is with him and is still afraid–to the point he separates his group.  He should trust in God (and His army) to protect him from Esau’s wrath.

Map Work:  Map of Aram (or Syria) and Israel:  http://www.bccfbroadcasts.com/maps/Isrl_Jdea.gif