BSF Study Questions People of the Promised Land 1: Lesson 29, Day 3: 1 Kings 11:9-13

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Summary 1 Kings 11:9-13:

The Lord became angry at Solomon for his heart had turned away from God and promised Solomon to tear away his kingdom and give it to one of his subordinates, but not during Solomon’s lifetime out of respect for his father, David. God would take the kingdom away from Solomon’s son instead — and not the whole tribe but just one tribe away from Solomon’s son (here we see the split in Israel happening).

BSF Study Questions People of the Promised Land 1: Lesson 29, Day 3: 1 Kings 11:9-13:

6) God was angry because Solomon’s heart had turned away from Him. He had built altars to other gods and worshipped them. Our God is a jealous God.  Following God leads to eternal life and joy in God’s presence. Everything is meaningless of this world without God. God is the only One, True God. God carries His people and sustains them/us and rescues us. God’s plans prevail. God is our creator and gives us life.

7) Part personal Question. My answer: People worship others, celebrities, material items, careers, kids, hobbies, or pets. An idol is anything you put above God or something your worship. I don’t worship anything really. I have passions and hobbies, but nothing I can’t live without.

8 ) God and promised Solomon to tear away his kingdom and give it to one of his subordinates, but not during Solomon’s lifetime out of respect for his father, David. God would take the kingdom away from Solomon’s son instead — and not the whole tribe but just one tribe away from Solomon’s son (here we see the split in Israel happening). God has mercy on His people by not punishing Solomon out of respect for David and not taking away the entire kingdom. God is just, and He does things with others in mind (like His people whom He knows needs a leader right now and not to be in foreign hands.

Conclusions BSF Study Questions People of the Promised Land 1 Lesson 29 Day 3: 1 Kings 11:9-13:

It’s sad to read about Solomon’s downfall, but instructive to us. We see the consequences Solomon could not, and we can learn from his mistakes.

End Notes BSF Study Questions People of the Promised Land 1 Lesson 29, Day 3: 1 Kings 11:9-13:

God had good reason to be displeased with Solomon: He had appeared to him twice, and Solomon still turned to other gods. Solomon’s sin was base ingratitude and a waste of great spiritual privilege.

We sometimes think that great spiritual experiences (like praying for a miracle or a sign) will keep us from sin and will keep us faithful to God. Solomon, the wisest man who ever lived, saw God and turned. What would be our reaction?

God promised the entire kingdom of Israel to the descendants of David forever, if they only remained obedient. David reminded Solomon of this promise shortly before his death (1 Kings 2:4). Yet they could not remain faithful even one generation.

Solomon’s kingdom had outstanding wealth, military power, and prestige. Yet the true security of Israel was in the blessing of God and in the obedience and faithfulness of their king.

Even in this great judgment, God shows undeserved mercy with deserved judgment. God announces that the kingdom will be divided, and part of it will be loyal to the descendants of David and part of it will be under a different dynasty.

Many other passages in the Old Testament (such as 2 Chronicles 11:12) tell us that the southern kingdom was made up of two tribes, Judah and Benjamin. Several times in this chapter the southern kingdom is referred to as one tribe. This is because either Benjamin is swallowed up in Judah, or the idea was one tribe in addition to Judah.

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BSF Study Questions John Lesson 29, Day 3: John 21:15-17

Summary of passage:  Jesus asks Peter if he loves him.  Peter says of course.  Jesus tells Peter to feed his lambs, take care of his sheep, and feed his sheep.

Questions:

6)  Jesus is letting Peter know he is forgiving for denying him three times after his arrest and that he has important work for him to do.  He’s encouraging him to forgive himself, get over the past, and concentrate on the work ahead.  He’s doing this in front of the others so the others support him as well.

7)  Personal Question.  My answer:  It seems I always have people placed in my way to teach me something the Lord is trying to get across to me.  He always knows just where I need to be or what I need to hear in order to move more towards Him.

8 )  Our past and our sins are forgiven.  Despite our faults of being human, we can still impact this world and make a difference.  In fact, we can use our shortcomings to help others who are struggling with the same sins (addiction, etc).  All is for a purpose for Him.

Conclusions:  Great example of God’s love for us.  There is no reason to wallow in self-pity over our sins when God doesn’t.  He has a plan for us and we can’t waste precious time avoiding it.

End Notes:  Jesus had already met with Peter individually on the day of His resurrection (Luke 24:34, 1 Corinthians 15:5). We can only wonder at what Jesus and Peter talked about at that first meeting. Nevertheless, it was still important for Jesus to restore Peter in the presence of the other disciples.

Peter means “rock” and Jesus does not address him as such here.  Peter hadn’t been a rock.  But he sure would become one!

Before Peter denied Jesus three times, he claimed to love Jesus more than the other disciples did (Matthew 26:33).  Jesus wanted to know if Peter still believed thus.  Of course, Jesus already knew the answer (as Peter points out in verse 17), but Jesus is asking for Peter’s self-knowledge, not his.

Some scholars say here Jesus could be asking if Peter were willing to give up fishing for him since “these” is a pronoun referring to something previous.  However, all indications are it’s the disciples he’s referring to.

Jesus uses the word “agape” when speaking of love and Peter responds with the Greek word “philio”.  Agape is the all-encompassing love and philip is brotherly love as we discussed HERE.

Most scholars agree there is a reason for the difference but most disagree as to what that reason could be.  Some think Peter was now being more reserved after his dismal denials earlier.

Jesus instructs Peter on how to act towards God’s people.  Jesus first emphasizes that the people are his.  The verb translated “take care” or “tend” has a much fuller meaning.  It means to shepherd his people.  Collect them, care for their every need, and lead them.

If Peter loved Jesus how he claimed he loved Jesus, then he would care for Jesus’ people.

Peter, abashed, knows why Jesus is asking him three times.  Three times he denied and now three times he gets to confirm.

This third question Jesus uses “philio” instead of agape.  Again, Jesus tells Peter to forget the past and move on to feeding his people.  Great stuff!

This reinstatement helped embolden Peter to become one of the early church’s most fearless spokesmen.