BSF Study Questions Romans Lesson 11, Day 5: Romans 6:19-23

Summary of passage:  We now offer our bodies in slavery to righteousness, which leads to holiness and eternal life.  Sin leads to death.

Questions:

11)  In essence, people want to be free to do whatever they wish with no repercussions.  This is just not reality. Under your own strength, you can’t do anything.  True freedom is living under God’s strength to overcome sin.  Following our own path is a slave to Satan.  It’s not how we were designed to live.  It’s a lie Satan tells you to keep on sinning.  When you do your own thing, Satan is in charge.

12)  Slave to sin: death.  Slave to God: holiness and eternal life.

13a)  Personal Question.  My answer:  Sin leads you to feeling broken and hopeless, unworthy and guilty, shameful and evil.  God uses these experiences to make you yearn for Him and His ways.  He replaces those feelings with hope and worthiness and holiness.

b)  Personal Question.  My answer:  Gratitude (my stock answer).  A desire to do His will through His strength.  Be more like Jesus every day.

Conclusions:  Question 13 is repetitive and could have done without it.  Question 11 is too broad.  It’s any sin.  Weak lesson.  Paul is basically repeating himself as well to emphasize how we now are free in Jesus.

End Notes:  The “human terms” is Paul apologizing for using slavery as his example from human lives because so many back then were slaves or if not slaves per se in essence slaves because Rome dictated their lives, but it was an accurate description of his point.

Paul speaks of habits when he says “impurity to ever-increasing wickedness”.  The longer you do something, the more ingrained it is and the harder to change.  In times of temptation, we must remember ever-lasting life.

Slavery to God produces holiness, and eventually eternal life.  There is no eternal life without holiness (Hebrews 12:14).

We must fight against every occasional sin because the benefits (life) far outweighs death!  This is Paul’s answer to Romans 6:15.  Remember, it’s a gift, not earned.

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BSF Study Questions Romans Lesson 11, Day 4: Romans 6:17-18

Summary of passage:  We are freed from sin thanks to our obedience to God.

Questions:

8 )  Part personal Question.  My answer:  You obey because you love God.  You obey out of reverence.  The Holy Spirit abhors sin and you flee towards God and obedience.  The opposite is you have a hard heart and you hate God.  Hence, you disobey and rebel.  Following the rules is going through the motions and is motivated by a fear of repercussions.  God frees us; there are no repercussions if we confess our sins and give them to Jesus.  We want to obey as opposed to being forced to obey.  My actions:  from the heart.

9) The pattern of teaching is the teaching of the Word that is stamped (allegiance) on our heart.

10)  Personal question that I’m sick of answering:  Freedom to pray.  To believe.  To serve.  To evangelize.  Freedom from fear.  Freedom from hell.  Freedom from worry.

Conclusions:  I don’t think BSF changed Question 9 because my NIV version does not use any of the words in quotes.  See my End Notes discussion on God’s mold for us.  Wish BSF would have asked about that instead of Question 10.

End Notes:  Paul puts it in the past tense because we have been freed from our slavery to sin. He also says that we have been set free by faith, which he describes as “wholeheartedly obeyed”.  The faith is put in God’s Word, which he describes as that form of teaching.  With faith in God and His word, you are set free.  Now live every day consistent with that freedom.

In Romans 6, we can be legally free and still choose to live like a prisoner. Paul has a simple command and encouragement for the Christian: be what you are.

Faith comes from the heart, not only the mind, and obedience is the result

The word “form” describes a mold used to shape molten metal. The idea is that God wants to shape us – first He melts us by the work of the Holy Spirit and the Word of God. Then He pours us into His mold of truth – and shapes us into His image.

Adam Clarke on that form of doctrine or teaching: “Here Christianity is represented under the notion of a mould, or die, into which they were cast, and from which they took the impression of its excellence. The figure upon this die is the image of God, righteousness and true holiness, which was stamped on their souls in believing the Gospel and receiving the Holy Ghost. The words . . . refer to the melting of metal, which, when it is liquefied, is cast into the mould, that it may receive the impression that is sunk or cut in the mould; and therefore the words may be literally translated, into which mould of doctrine ye have been cast. They were melted down under the preaching of the word, and then were capable of receiving the stamp of its purity.”

Verse 18 answers the question in verse 15.  Righteousness is now in charge, not sin.  We are born again as slaves (willing servants) to righteousness as Jesus’s death broke the bonds of sin.  We willingly serve Jesus and we never have to sin again although we will as long as we’re in the flesh. It’s resisting one temptation at a time.  We can live free!

BSF Study Questions Romans Lesson 11, Day 3: Romans 6:15-16

Summary of passage:  Paul concludes again that we don’t sin just because God forgives.  We are like slaves and we are slaves to the one we obey.  It’s up to us if it’s God (who leads to righteousness) or Satan (who leads to death).

Questions:

6)  Paul starts by asking us what do we say and conclude.  In verse 1, Paul is focusing on the argument that one goes on sinning so grace may increase.  In verse 15, Paul focuses on the fact we should sin because we are under grace and forgiven.  Also, note the subtle difference in verb tense (more pronounced in the ancient Greek:  “go on sinning” and “sin”.  Verse 1 is talking about perpetual sinning.  Verse 15 is speaking of an occasional sin here and there.  More explanation in End Notes.

7a)  Under Satan, you will forever sin because of human nature.  Under God who offers us righteousness through grace we are forgiven and our sins are washed away.  We are free from our sins and will thus serve righteousness instead of sin.

b)  Personal Question.  My answer:  Slave to righteousness because I accept Jesus as my Savior who through God’s grace forgives my sins, cleanses me, and thus makes me righteous before God.

Conclusions:  I groaned on 7b and felt like a school kid forced to recite the class rules for the thousandth time.  It’s basically asking you if you’re saved.  A yes or no would have sufficed or better yet a question on the passage.

End Notes:   Wuest explains the verb tense in verse 1 & 15:  “The verb in verse one is in the present subjunctive, speaking of habitual, continuous action. The verb in verse fifteen is in the aorist subjunctive, referring to a single act.”  Again, the answer is no.  Sin and a saved life do not go hand in hand.

Paul is saying in verse 16 that you serve someone so why not Christ instead of the devil (obedience versus sin)?  You can apply this across the spectrum such as slave to food or others’ approval or success or wealth, etc.

It seems the question came from those who were afraid that the doctrine of justification by faith alone will remove all moral restraint.  Paul rejects this idea and shows in the following verses how Christians don’t throw morality to the wind.  Instead, they exchange sin for righteousness as their master.

BSF Study Questions Romans Lesson 11, Day 2: Romans 6:12-14

Summary of passage:  Sin is not your master since you are under grace.  Offer yourselves and your bodies to God, not sin, as instruments of righteousness.

Questions:

3)  We are alive through believe in Jesus Christ.

4a)  Negative:  “do not let sin reign in your mortal body so that you obey its evil desires.”  “Do not offer parts of your body to sin, as instruments of wickedness.”

Positive:  “Offer yourselves to God” and “offer the parts of your body to him as instruments of righteousness.”

In this instance, lasting change has to have both:  you cannot keep your evil ways AND be instruments of God.  You have to consciously lessen the evil and increase the good.

b)  Personal Question.  My answer:  Any time I sin I’m giving myself up to sin and every time I choose God I’m giving myself to Him.  This is a daily, minute occurrence with no glaring examples that come to mind.  It could be when I’m being selfish or prideful or even mean.  This could be as well when I’m compassionate, giving, and kind.

5)  Personal Question.  My answer:  God is with me always and I can draw upon His power and the power of the Holy Spirit to overcome sin.

Conclusions:  Weak.  Very, very weak.

End Notes:  This is a call by Paul to Christians to live in the freedom Jesus’s blood provides us as many are unsure.  Paul says stop yielding to the fleshly desire to sin which leads to a life of discouragement, fear, anxiety, and defeat.

We are dead to sin and alive to God.  We must refuse to let sin reign in our lives and offer ourselves to God.

The parts of our body–eyes, ears, mouth, lips, etc–must be used for good and not given in to sin.  You could think of “instruments” as weapons.  How God used David’s hands to slay Goliath.  Later, how David allowed his eyes to be used for sin when he gazed upon Bathsheba.

Once we take away the sin we must use them for something–righteousness–offered to God.

The priests in the Old Testament consecrated their bodies to God. Sacrificial blood was applied to the ear, to the thumb, and on the big toe, showing that those parts of their body (and all other parts) belonged to God and were to be used for His glory (Exodus 29:20).  The idea is the same.

We present ourselves to God as being alive from the dead. This first has the idea that all connection with the previous life – the old man – must be done away with. That life is dead and gone. Secondly, it has the idea of obligation, because we owe everything to the One who has given us new life!

“For sin shall not be your master”:  Spurgeon said that these words give us a test, a promise, and an encouragement.

1) It is a test of our claim to be Christians. Does anger have dominion over you? Does murmuring and complaining? Does covetousness have dominion over you? Does pride? Does laziness have dominion over you? If sin has dominion over us, we should seriously ask if we are really converted.

2) It is a promise of victory. It doesn’t say that “sin will not be present in us,” because that will only be fulfilled when we are resurrected in glory. But it does promise that sin will not have dominion over us because of the great work Jesus did in us when we were born again.

3) It is an encouragement for hope and strength in the battle against sin. God hasn’t condemned you under the dominion of sin – He has set you free in Jesus. This is encouragement for the Christian struggling against sin, for the new Christian, and for the backslider.

Law clearly defined God’s standard, and shows us where we fall short of it. But it cannot give the freedom from sin that grace provides. Remember that grace reigns through righteousness (Romans 5:21). Grace (not law) provides the freedom and the power to live over sin.

This shows again that a life lived truly under grace will be a righteous life.

For the Jews, their life was completely about living under the Law.  Now Paul says after Jesus we live under grace.

Paul has answered his question from Romans 6:1. Why don’t we just continue in habitual sin so grace may abound? Because when we are saved, when our sins are forgiven, and God’s grace is extended to us, we are radically changed. The old man is dead, and the new man lives.

In light of these remarkable changes, it is utterly incompatible for a new creation in Jesus to be comfortable in habitual sin. A state of sin can only be temporary for the Christian. As Spurgeon is credited with saying: “The grace that does not change my life will not save my soul.”

John states the same idea in another way: Whoever abides in Him does not [habitually] sin. Whoever[habitually] sins has neither seen Him nor known Him . . . Whoever has been born of God does not[habitually] sin, for his seed remains in him; and he cannot [habitually] sin, because he has been born of God (1 John 3:6 and 3:9).

The changes may not come all at one time, and they may not come to each area of one’s life at the same time, but they will be there and they will be real and they will be increasing as time goes on.

You cannot sin for you love God. We are changed and free through grace.

BSF Study Questions John Lesson 11, Day 5: John 7:40-53

Summary of passage:  Here we see repetition from earlier in the chapter.  The people are divided on who Jesus is:  The Prophet, The Christ, or just a man from Galilee.  Again, no one could lay on hand on Jesus because his time had not yet come as the guards admit he speaks so differently.  The Pharisees don’t understand how the educated ones (them) don’t believe in Jesus but the uneducated ones (the rabble) do.  Nicodemus, not admitting he may believe, says they shouldn’t be so quick to condemn him.  Again, the Pharisees say no prophet can come from Galilee.

Questions:

11)  The promised ruler or prophet to rescue them from the Romans.  Because he was one of them who performed miracles and spoke of ushering in a kingdom (of heaven of course) but they thought on earth.

12a)  Feebly if you ask me and it was barely a defense.  Instead of saying he may believe in Jesus, he just pointed out how Jesus needs a fair hearing before being condemned.  No.  The Jewish leaders had already convicted Jesus because he was wielding too much power and a threat to them and their rule and way of life.  Nicodemus did point out the leaders hypocrisy in not following the law as written but claiming they do.

b)  Personal Question.  My answer:  Jesus has his timing is a frequent defense of mine when others complain of unanswered prayers.  I think Nicodemus defended Jesus half-heartedly, afraid still for his life.  I defend him whole-heartedly.

Conclusions:  Nothing has changed in terms of the people since Jesus first stepped out on the scene.  Some believe; some don’t.  Seeing the tentativeness of Nicodemus is eye-opening.  We can’t be like that.  Jesus desires every warrior on his side whole-heartedly.  We must be bold, not timid, and answer his call when it comes.

End Notes:  Some thought an ancient prophet would be risen from the dead and precede the Messiah.  Others thought of Jesus as the Messiah.  Some rejected him and some were ignorant of Jesus’ origins and his birth.

Jesus elicted strong opinions about who he was.  “Divided” is a strong word.  However, the followers of Christ should never be divided.  We are united because of Christ and the cross.

Again, the officers could not arrest Jesus because it was not his time yet.  He spoke like no man and the Greek implication here is that he’s more than a man.

The pride of the Pharisees shines here as they can’t believe commoners/uneducated people can believe in Jesus when they are the ones who obviously know everything.  This is the pilgrim crowd who has come for the Festival of Tabernacles.  The Pharisees exaggerated the ignorance of the people knowledge of Scripture (which was probably better than the average Christian of today and they couldn’t read).  However, the average Jew did pay little attention to the details, being too bogged down with the struggle for daily subsistence and hard physical labor.  Hence, these regulations were widely disregarded.

Nicodemus did point out the untruth of a leader believing in Jesus and did point out their hypocrisy as they disregarded their own laws in condemning Jesus by hearsay.

Again, we see the prejudice against Galileans as the religious leaders believe nothing good comes from there.

In fact, a prophet had risen from Galilee.  Jonah (who was a picture of Jesus Christ) came from Gath Hepher, which was three miles north of Nazareth in Lower Galilee (2 Kings 14:25).  Elijah was from Thisbe; and perhaps also Nahum and Hosea were from Galilee.  Their contempt for Galilee made them lose sight of historical accuracy.  Most importantly, the Pharisees overlooked the idea that God can choose a prophet from anywhere He likes.

BSF Study Questions John Lesson 11, Day 4: John 7:28-39; 14:16-18

Summary of passages:  John 7:28-39:  There are many who doubt he is the Christ, especially since they know Jesus and where he came from. Jesus says he is from God. Many try to seize him but they can’t because it is not Jesus’ time yet. Some believed in him. The Pharisees sent guards to arrest him. Jesus says how he is only here for a short time and where he goes, they cannot come. No one understood he was speaking of his death and resurrection.

Jesus continues speaking and on the last day of the Feast repeats his call for those thirsty to come to him and receive streams of living water or the Spirit.

John 14:16-18:  Jesus promises to ask God for the Holy Spirit to abide in believers so he’ll be with us forever.

Questions:

8 )  The crowds were whispering Jesus’ words that pointed out how the Pharisees are hypocrites and he may be the Messiah.  Basically, Jesus is threatening their authority and power.  They failed because Jesus is protected until it is his time and it’s not his time yet.  The guards put it this way in John 7:46:  “No one ever spoke the way this man does.”  This shows powerfully how God is in control of everything, even my situation and circumstances and my life.

9) I think he meant two things.  To believers, he meant he would be in heaven and we cannot come until the appointed time.  To unbelievers, I think he meant they would never find him and never get to heaven.

10a)  God and the Holy Spirit.

b)  Personal Question.  My answer:  When I accepted Jesus as my Lord and Savior as a kid.  It overflows to others as I do God’s work and put Him first and put others first.

Conclusions:  So much here!  Please read the End Notes as they are extensive.  We read John 14:16-18 but didn’t touch on it. We probably will when we get there.  It’s part of the assurances Jesus gives to the disciples (and to us) before he leaves earth–the promise of the Holy Spirit.

End Notes:  John 7:28-39 (Taken from yesterday’s analysis):  Jesus is probably being sarcastic in verse 28. “You know me; yet, you doubt!” Jesus repeats he is from God.

Jesus could not be arrested until his time had come. Till then he was protected by God. (John 7:46)

Many believed. After all, who could do as much as Jesus has already done?

Jesus assures the temple guards he will go away–at the appointed time.

The people did not understand Jesus was speaking of heaven so they guessed the Greeks. From the time of the exile, many jews lived outside the Holy Land and could be found in most cities throughout the Roman Empire.

The Feast of Tabernacles lasted eight days. During the first seven days water from the Pool of Siloam was carried in a golden pitcher and poured out at the altar to remind everyone of the water God miraculously provided for a thirsty Israel in the wilderness. Most probably on the eighth day there was no pouring of water – only prayers for water – to remind them that they came into the Promised Land.

On the eighth day the people ceased to dwell in the tabernacles and was probably no feasting. Philo says it was a solemn conclusion.

This was the last feast-time Jesus would spend in Jerusalem before the Passover of His death. This was the last day of the last feast; the last time He would speak to many of them before His crucifixion.

Notice Jesus said IN A LOUD VOICE. This was the most important thing he said the entire time so you’d better listen (personally, I can’t picture Jesus screaming so this must have been a sight!). Also, teachers usually sat so Jesus standing was to draw attention.

The celebration of the Feast of Tabernacles emphasized how God provided water to Israel in the wilderness on their way to Canaan. Jesus boldly called people to Himself to drink and satisfy their deepest thirst, their spiritual thirst.

Anyone is invited. Since there is no water being poured out on the 8th day of the feast, this was an impressive statement indeed. Jesus is the water.

Drinking is a common act. All of us can drink. But do we drink of the right stuff?

If you trust in Jesus, living water will flow from your heart and into your life and the life of those around you. Revelation 22:1 (which was not written yet at this time) speaks of waters flowing after the End Times perpetually. What a picture!

The Greek is “out of the belly”.

Zechariah that one day a fountain would be open to the house of David, and living waters would go out from Jerusalem (Zechariah 13:1, 14:8); and of Isaiah that God would pour water upon the thirsty (Isaiah 44:3, 55:1).

The Spirit is not yet given until after the Ascension and Pentecost (Acts 2)

“Given” was added. The true meaning is “it was not yet spirit”. It is more a sense of “working” and “dispensation”.

“Glorified” is Jesus’ exaltation, crucifixion, and resurrection. The fullness of the Spirit’s work depends on Jesus’ prior work of salvation.

John 14:16-18:  This is the first in a series of important passages about the Holy Spirit (John 14:26; 15:26; 16:7-15).  The second of three assurances given to the disciples on the night of Jesus departure.

Jesus is assuring the disciples he will give them a helper after he leaves; he will not abandon them.  He knew they would need God’s help to do the work set forth for them.  He will ask when he gets to heaven.

“Counselor” is actually the Greek parakletos meaning advisor, mediator, legal defender, or intercessor.  It denotes strengthen and is another of the same kind.

The devil is the accuser.

The Holy Spirit will be with you forever, contrasting with the Old Testament where cleansing was temporary.

The Spirit is characterized by truth.  He brings people to the truth of God.

“Know”, “with”, “in” are key here.  Jesus was with them.  Later, it will be in them.  Knowing Him is all of our goals.

The disciples of a particular teacher among the Hebrews called him father; his scholars were called his children, and, on his death, were considered as orphans.

Spurgeon considered several ways that the followers of Jesus are not like orphans.

· An orphan has parents who are dead; the Spirit shows us Jesus is alive

· An orphan left alone; the Spirit draws us close to God’s presence

· An orphan has lost their provider; the Spirit provides all things

· An orphan is left without instruction; the Spirit teaches us all things

· An orphan has no defender; the Spirit is protector

Jesus again promised to come to the disciples (John 14:3), fulfilled by His resurrection, by the sending of the Spirit, and by the promise of His bodily return to this earth.

BSF Study Questions John Lesson 11, Day 3: John 7:14-39

Summary of passage:  Still at the Feast of Tabernacles, Jesus preaches.  All were impressed by his learning and Jesus says it comes from God and if you work for God it is truth, not honor for yourself.  Jesus says the people are trying to kill him, which they deny and say he is demon-possessed.  Jesus points out their hypocrisy, saying circumcision can be performed on the Sabbath but not his healing of a man who could not walk.

There are many who doubt he is the Christ, especially since they know Jesus and where he came from.  Jesus says he is from God.  Many try to seize him but they can’t because it is not Jesus’ time yet.  Some believed in him.  The Pharisees sent guards to arrest him.  Jesus says how he is only here for a short time and where he goes, they cannot come.  No one understood he was speaking of his death and resurrection.

Jesus continues speaking and on the last day of the Feast repeats his call for those thirsty to come to him and receive streams of living water or the Spirit.

Questions:

5)  Those who speak on his own do so to gain honor for himself but those who work for God speak the truth.  Those working for God will know his teaching is from God.

6a)  Healed the man who could not walk.  Keeping the Sabbath holy and doing no work.

b)  That they are hypocrites and do not follow the law of Moses and basically interpret it however they want.

7a)  God’s.  They didn’t know him because they don’t know God.  Men are of the devil, the darkness, corrupt, and blind to Him.  Their hearts are not His.

b)  Personal Question.  My answer:  All the difference.  I am inept on my own.  With him anything is possible.

Conclusions:  I love how Jesus points out man’s hypocrisy over and over again and points out their hearts to them.  If you don’t know God, you won’t know Jesus.  If you don’t know Jesus, you won’t know God.  And the Holy Spirit will never come either.  Love it!

End Notes:  The Jewish leaders questions Jesus’ credentials since they cannot question his content.  Jesus had never been the disciple of a recognized Jewish teacher.  Jesus never says he’s self-taught.  He’s God taught.  Just reading the words won’t cut it.  You have to obey God and the words will infiltrate your heart.

“The Jews” are distinct from “the crowds” (verse 12)–all of which are Jews.  “The Jews” usually refer to the leadership.

In this Gospel, only God is spoken of as “being” and Jesus (here).

Jesus tells them how he always keeps the law and none of them do.  Yet he is the one they are trying to kill when they are the guilty ones.

The “crowd” didn’t know Jesus was being sought for his healing of the man by the well so they thought he was crazy thinking he was wanted. They weren’t the leadership or those who knew of the plot.  The accusation of “demon-possessed” seems to have been a popular one back in the day as it shows up again in John in 8:48-52; 10:20-21)

Circumcision can be major surgery if one is older.  Jesus is saying you are cutting people on the Sabbath and I am making them whole.  Appearances can be deceptive (hence Justice wears a blindfold).

He cites the law of circumcision (Leviticus 12:3; Exodus 12:44) to show that work was done on the Sabbath, necessary work, which deeds of mercy fall into.  This law actually went back to Abraham (Genesis 17:10-12).  His point was that the leadership did not understand what the Sabbath meant.

The people from Jerusalem know Jesus is a wanted man and are wondering why he is still preaching.

Doubt of the Messiah again is routed in the Bible but twisted with man’s preconceived ideas of the Word.  Malachi 3:1 says that God’s messenger will come suddenly to the temple.  This was the kind of saying that made them think the Messiah would come out of nowhere to show Himself to Israel.  That he would just appear and be a magical being.  Even though God’s Word never says this this is the idea the Jews have built up in their minds.

Jesus is probably being sarcastic in verse 28.  “You know me; yet, you doubt!”  Jesus repeats he is from God.

Jesus could not be arrested until his time had come.  Till then he was protected by God. (John 7:46)

Many believed.  After all, who could do as much as Jesus has already done?

Jesus assures the temple guards he will go away–at the appointed time.

The people did not understand Jesus was speaking of heaven so they guessed the Greeks.  From the time of the exile, many jews lived outside the Holy Land and could be found in most cities throughout the Roman Empire.

The Feast of Tabernacles lasted eight days.  During the  first seven days water from the Pool of Siloam was carried in a golden pitcher and poured out at the altar to remind everyone of the water God miraculously provided for a thirsty Israel in the wilderness.  Most probably on the eighth day there was no pouring of water – only prayers for water – to remind them that they came into the Promised Land.

On the eighth day the people ceased to dwell in the tabernacles and was probably no feasting. Philo says it was a solemn conclusion.

This was the last feast-time Jesus would spend in Jerusalem before the Passover of His death. This was the last day of the last feast; the last time He would speak to many of them before His crucifixion.

Notice Jesus said IN A LOUD VOICE.  This was the most important thing he said the entire time so you’d better listen (personally, I can’t picture Jesus screaming so this must have been a sight!).  Also, teachers usually sat so Jesus standing was to draw attention.

The celebration of the Feast of Tabernacles emphasized how God provided water to Israel in the wilderness on their way to Canaan. Jesus boldly called people to Himself to drink and satisfy their deepest thirst, their spiritual thirst.

Anyone is invited.  Since there is no water being poured out on the 8th day of the feast, this was an impressive statement indeed.  Jesus is the water.

Drinking is a common act.  All of us can drink.  But do we drink of the right stuff?

If you trust in Jesus, living water will flow from your heart and into your life and the life of those around you. Revelation 22:1 (which was not written yet at this time) speaks of waters flowing after the End Times perpetually.  What a picture!

The Greek is “out of the belly”.

Zechariah that one day a fountain would be open to the house of David, and living waters would go out from Jerusalem (Zechariah 13:1, 14:8); and of Isaiah that God would pour water upon the thirsty (Isaiah 44:3, 55:1).

The Spirit is not yet given until after the Ascension and Pentecost (Acts 2)

“Given” was added.  The true meaning is “it was not yet spirit”.  It is more a sense of “working” and “dispensation”.

“Glorified” is Jesus’ exaltation, crucifixion, and resurrection.  The fullness of the Spirit’s work depends on Jesus’ prior work of salvation.