BSF Study Questions Romans Lesson 10, Day 5: Romans 6:9-11

Summary of passage:  We are no longer slaves to sin since Christ’s death has freed us from sin.  Since Christ rose from the dead, he lives!  As do we.

Questions:

12)  Part personal Question.  My answer:  Jesus was raised from the dead.  He cannot die again since he defeated death through this act.  He died to sin and its power forever.  He lives now to God.  Sin now no longer has power over us either and we are now alive to God in Christ (righteous and sanctified and justified).

13)  Personal Question.  My answer:  In my home, community, work, and church, my life is the same:  sin’s power is broken.  I live for God.  He rules.  The end.

Conclusions:  There is nothing new here and BSF is obviously out of questions to ask since we just regurgitated yesterday’s lesson.  Now I see how answering only 6 questions has come about:  because of the repetitive nature of these questions!

End Notes: [Pulled from YESTERDAY]

Jesus’s death broke our slavery to sin and death since now we have eternal life.

Our new life is a life we live to God–we live the life God wants not the life we want. Ezekiel predicted this in Ezekiel 36:26:  “I will give you a new heart and put a new spirit in you; I will remove from you your heart of stone and give you a heart of flesh.”

We now want to do God’s will and with practice and perseverance we will overcome!

We are dead to sin but alive in Jesus.

Summation of Romans 6:1-11:  Spirit baptism brings the regenerated person into a redemptive relationship through his participation in and identification with the death, burial, and resurrection of Christ and the subsequent infusion of the merit of that death and resurrection into the life of the believer, by which he may live as one dead to sin but alive to God.

Fun Fact:  The first occurrence in Romans of “in Christ”, which is often found in Paul’s writings.  True believers are “in Christ” because they have died with Christ and have been raised to new life in union with him.

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BSF Study Questions Romans Lesson 10, Day 4: Romans 6:5-10

Summary of passage:  We are united with Christ in his death and resurrection.  We are no longer slaves to sin since Christ’s death has freed us from sin.  Since Christ rose from the dead, he lives!  As do we.

Questions:

9)  In death, resurrection, and life.

10)  The old self (our sin nature) is you before you accepted Christ as your Savior–the one patterned after Adam and who rebels and resists God and His commands.  Once you believe in Christ you were inhabited by the Holy Spirit and changed.  You are made new in righteousness and holiness!

11)  Personal Question.  My answer:  I thank God for all aspects of choosing me to be saved, making me holy and righteous and able to stand before God for all of eternity.  I know He’s set me free from sin.

Conclusions:  Weak lesson.  Very, very weak especially since two questions are on different Biblical passages.

End Notes:  All three are essential:  united with Christ in death, resurrection and life.

Your old self must die because it can never measure up to God’s standards.  Once Christ died and was resurrected our new self is obedient to God and seeks Him out.  Evil is still in us but now we abhor it and it has no power over us.

You may ask:  Why do we still sin then if our old self is dead?  Our old self is distinct from the flesh, which is our inner desires, passions, and impulses that play out in our mind, our will, and our emotions.  This is the daily battle we must fight to overcome.

The flesh is remnants of your old self. It is influenced by the world, which is in a constant battle to overcome God, and the devil attacks us through the flesh.

Our job/challenge is to strengthen our new self in order to overcome the flesh. We do this through prayer and Bible study and God’s words and being cognizant of it.  It will increasingly exert itself to where this struggle is lessened and lessened.

Jesus’s death broke our slavery to sin and death since now we have eternal life.

Our new life is a life we live to God–we live the life God wants not the life we want. Ezekiel predicted this in Ezekiel 36:26:  “I will give you a new heart and put a new spirit in you; I will remove from you your heart of stone and give you a heart of flesh.”

We now want to do God’s will and with practice and perseverance we will overcome!

BSF Study Questions Romans Lesson 10, Day 3: Romans 6:1-4

Summary of passage:  Paul pauses to answer any questions and to clarify:  No!  We don’t go on sinning just because grace is bigger than sin! When we’re baptized, we’re baptized into Christ and his life and death.

Questions:

6)  Believers.  We became different people when we died to sin.

7)  Water baptism is us identifying with Jesus’s death and resurrection.  It’s a spiritual death and a renewal, receiving the Holy Spirit.  Baptism depicts graphically what happens as a result of the Christian’s union with Christ, which comes with faith–through faith we are united with Christ just as through our natural birth we are united with Adam.  It gives the believer entry into the righteousness and new life in Christ through an identification with Christ himself.

8 ) Part personal Question.  My answer:  Once we accept God’s grace and gift of Jesus into our life we are born again with the Holy Spirit and therefore our relationship with sin is permanently changed. We have died to sin and cannot live any longer it it.  For the most part, I lead a guilt-free life, knowing God has forgiven all my sins.  I strive to do His will in my life.  I pray and listen and obey (I’m not perfect in this mind you).  I abhor sin.  I strive my best not to sin.  I live a life full of contentment knowing where my home is.  I try to share this with others through my example.

Conclusions:  This is an important concept to get:  As believers all of our sin is washed away by the blood of Jesus Christ.  We are given a new self (which we’ll explore in the next lesson) when we accepted Jesus and were baptized. He now lives inside all of us, setting us apart for all of eternity.  It doesn’t get any better than that!

End Notes:  [Same End Notes as YESTERDAY]  In verses 3:21-5:21 Paul explains how God has provided for our redemption and justification.  He next explains the doctrine of sanctification–the process by which believers grow to maturity in Christ and are made holy.  He treats the subject in 3 parts:  1) freedom from sin’s tyranny (ch 6)  2)  freedom from the law’s condemnation (ch 7)  3)  life in the power of the Holy Spirit (ch 8)  This will be Chapters 6:1-8:39

Throughout history, you’d be surprised who twisted these verses (and Paul’s words) to justify their wrong-doings (this is why Paul is harping on this topic).  The Russian, self-proclaimed monk Rasputin for one said “I’ll sin more to earn more forgiveness.”  If you don’t know much about Rasputin, he’s a fascinating character (albeit evil one) in history who led a bizarre life of immorality, but heavily influenced the last Imperial family of Russia.  In essence, he was a very good con man, which was unfortunate for the Royals and some scholars even say he contributed to their downfall.

Paul often used this writing technique:  He pauses in the middle of an argument to answer objections or questions that may be occurring to the reader.

Paul’s concern here is that people will misuse God’s grace and use God’s forgiveness of their sins as an excuse to continue sinning (like Rasputin did).  It’s God’s job to forgive and our job to sin, right?

This explains the early church’s emphasis on an angry God, His wrath, and the law because man has no motivation to stay the straight and narrow path.

Paul points out that when we accepted Jesus our relationship to sin has changed; therefore, we have died to sin and a life of sinning is incompatible with life.  Paul will explain this in detail but his point is clear:  Before, we were dead in sin (Ephesians 2:1); now we are dead to sin.

In New Testament Times baptism so closely followed conversion that the two were considered part of one event.  Baptism is closely associated with faith although not the means by which we enter into a faith relationship with Jesus.

The ancient Greek word for baptized means “to immerse or overwhelm something.” When a person is baptized in water, they are immersed or covered over with water. When they are baptized with the Holy Spirit (Matthew 3:11Acts 1:5), they are “immersed” or “covered over” with the Holy Spirit. When they are baptized with suffering (Mark 10:39), they are “immersed” or “covered over” with suffering.  Here, Paul refers to being baptized – “immersed” or “covered over” – in Christ Jesus.

Being baptized with water is us identifying with Jesus’s death and resurrection.  It’s not cleansing here as Paul uses the term.  In essence, you can’t die and rise again without it changing you.  It’s akin to almost dying.  You’re changed when you have a near-death experience. We die spiritually and rise with Jesus!

BSF Study Questions Romans Lesson 10, Day 2: Romans 6:1-4

Summary of passage:  Paul pauses to answer any questions and to clarify:  No!  We don’t go on sinning just because grace is bigger than sin! When we’re baptized, we’re baptized into Christ and his life and death.

Questions:

3)  Paul had just explained that God’s grace is bigger than our sins and no matter how great our sins, God’s grace and Jesus’s death and resurrection are greater to justify us all.  He wants to clarify to all that continuing to choose sin because you know God will forgive you is a sin!

4)  God is not happy.

5)  Personal Question.  My answer:  Honestly, this thought has never occurred to me.  I’ve never read Romans before nor have I heard a lecture on this topic.  Hence, I’ve never sinned with that thought ever.  Again, honestly, they don’t really strengthen me (this idea).  I know sin is evil and against God so I in my human fallacy choose God instead.

Conclusions:  Questions were great up until question number 5 where it got personal and didn’t apply to me (and I’m sure to many of you).  Who purposely sins?  As Paul explains, then they are not right with God when they do.

End Notes:  In verses 3:21-5:21 Paul explains how God has provided for our redemption and justification.  He next explains the doctrine of sanctification–the process by which believers grow to maturity in Christ and are made holy.  He treats the subject in 3 parts:  1) freedom from sin’s tyranny (ch 6)  2)  freedom from the law’s condemnation (ch 7)  3)  life in the power of the Holy Spirit (ch 8)  This will be Chapters 6:1-8:39

Throughout history, you’d be surprised who twisted these verses (and Paul’s words) to justify their wrong-doings (this is why Paul is harping on this topic).  The Russian, self-proclaimed monk Rasputin for one said “I’ll sin more to earn more forgiveness.”  If you don’t know much about Rasputin, he’s a fascinating character (albeit evil one) in history who led a bizarre life of immorality, but heavily influenced the last Imperial family of Russia.  In essence, he was a very good con man, which was unfortunate for the Royals and some scholars even say he contributed to their downfall.

Paul often used this writing technique:  He pauses in the middle of an argument to answer objections or questions that may be occurring to the reader.

Paul’s concern here is that people will misuse God’s grace and use God’s forgiveness of their sins as an excuse to continue sinning (like Rasputin did).  It’s God’s job to forgive and our job to sin, right?

This explains the early church’s emphasis on an angry God, His wrath, and the law because man has no motivation to stay the straight and narrow path.

Paul points out that when we accepted Jesus our relationship to sin has changed; therefore, we have died to sin and a life of sinning is incompatible with life.  Paul will explain this in detail but his point is clear:  Before, we were dead in sin (Ephesians 2:1); now we are dead to sin.

In New Testament Times baptism so closely followed conversion that the two were considered part of one event.  Baptism is closely associated with faith although not the means by which we enter into a faith relationship with Jesus.

The ancient Greek word for baptized means “to immerse or overwhelm something.” When a person is baptized in water, they are immersed or covered over with water. When they are baptized with the Holy Spirit (Matthew 3:11Acts 1:5), they are “immersed” or “covered over” with the Holy Spirit. When they are baptized with suffering (Mark 10:39), they are “immersed” or “covered over” with suffering.  Here, Paul refers to being baptized – “immersed” or “covered over” – in Christ Jesus.

Being baptized with water is us identifying with Jesus’s death and resurrection.  It’s not cleansing here as Paul uses the term.  In essence, you can’t die and rise again without it changing you.  It’s akin to almost dying.  You’re changed when you have a near-death experience. We die spiritually and rise with Jesus!

BSF Study Questions John Lesson 10, Day 5: John 6:60-71

Summary of passage:  Many of Jesus’ converts were offended by his bread and blood analogies and abandoned him.  Jesus, of course, knew this would happen because the Father did not draw them to him.  He directly asked the 12 disciples if they want to leave him too.  Simon Peter says no, they believe him, and besides, where else will they go? (Not the best logic here, Peter).  Jesus said he chose them but one of them is from the devil (Simon Iscariot who will betray Jesus).

Questions:

11)  Part personal Question.  My answer:  The flesh (our physical bodies) will rot away.  Only the Spirit remains.

12)  Part personal Question.  My answer:  They were offended by Jesus’ bread and blood analogy and just couldn’t accept it.  Not similar teachings on the truth.  Teachings on the untruth, yes, have offended me and I won’t listen.  I just found a different church that spoke the truth.

13)  Part personal Question.  My answer:  Both agree there is no one else to turn to and God/Jesus is their refuge.  “God is the strength of my heart and my portion forever.”  There is no one else but God.  There is nothing on earth but Him.  I live and breathe for Him alone.

Conclusions:  I love here how Jesus knows everything.  How he knows who’ll reject him, but he never quits.  He faces it head-on.  What an example of power to follow.

End Notes:  Jesus’ words were hard to accept, not understand.  I think most people understand Jesus as the way, the truth, and the life.  But accepting that is what is the stumbling block for most.

Jesus offends and that is ok.  Jesus takes nothing back.  He keeps telling the Truth.  It will offend some.  Some, however, will see the light.  That is who Jesus is fighting for here.

Here was probably were many of his groupies realized the free stuff was going to end.  Following Jesus was much, much more.  Much more difficult and challenging and sacrificing.  Some preferred the easy life.  They are the ones who abandoned him.  Can you imagine?

Jesus says better to be offended now than when he ascends in glory to the judgement throne!

Jesus repeatedly emphasizes it’s the Spirit, not the flesh, that matters.

“From this time” could mean “because of this”

Scholars believe only the 12 were left standing.  Hence, Jesus asked them if they would leave as well.  This must have been excruciatingly painful for Jesus to see so many lost souls reject him.  Many would return.  But the point had to be made:  I’m not here to increase your wealth or ease in life.  I’m here for your souls!

Jesus asks the question with the answer “no” expected.

Peter speaks for the 12 here.  He calls Jesus “Lord”.  He recognizes there are no alternatives.  He realizes it’s about the spirit and eternal life.  He calls Jesus the Messiah or Holy One of God.

Jesus chose the 12 disciples (remember, he called them).  Devil is better translated as slanderer or false accuser.

There are Judases even today amongst God’s people who are in church undetected.  We must always be wary and never let anyone (nor them) cause us to stray from God’s path for our lives.

It’s bad when Jesus Christ, the Savior of the world, calls you a “devil”.  Judas is a prime example of a man who let one sin lead to other, bigger sins–a trap all of us can get caught in.  If you take your sins to Jesus, he will forgive.  Don’t let shame and remorse overcloud you and lead to despair.  Nothing is too big for Jesus.

Judas was from Karioth, as we learn from all four gospels.  All call him Iscariot, which means ‘a man of Karioth’, which was a city in the southern part of Judah (Joshua 15:25), south of Hebron in the dry Negeb.  Map HERE

BSF Study Questions John Lesson 10, Day 4: John 6:51-59

Summary of passage:  The word “flesh” did grab the Jews attention and began to argue how Jesus could sacrifice himself.  Jesus says whoever eats his flesh and drinks his blood will have eternal life at Capernaum.

Questions:

8 )  The blood of the Passover lamb was the sign for God to passover their houses and not bring judgment on them.  It represents atonement for sins.

9)  The Jews ate the meat as the Lord’s Passover.  If the people ate of the meat and used the blood as atonement for sins, eating of his flesh and using his blood will atone for their sins as well.  Jesus’ was just forever, granting eternal life.

10)  Part personal Question.  My answer:  If you don’t eat and drink of him, you will have no life.  Whoever does eat and drink of him, will have eternal life and be raised at the last day.  You will remain in him and he in you.  Eating and drinking is what becomes a part of you, fuels your body, and grants you energy for life.  Having Jesus be my fuel, my energy, my everything encourages me to keep up the good fight even and always work for him.  It increases I believe little by little everyday as I see others struggle and suffer and life move on.

Conclusions:  Jesus says the same thing over and over again for us dunderheads:  eat of me and be saved.  A profound truth for all believers.

End Notes:  Scholars believe the Jewish leaders here willfully twisted Jesus’ words.  They are choosing not to believe him.  And we all know what those consequences are.  However, it was probable that some did take Jesus’ words as cannibalism.  Remember this is the time of Rome and barbarians.  These acts did occur and still do today.

Eating of flesh and drinking of blood also points to sacrifice.

Jesus is our food and drink.  When we truly receive him, he abides in us.  Eating and drinking is receiving.  We receive Jesus through faith.  We must actually take him in satisfy our hunger and thirst.

Jesus’ statements offended many.  They were meant to.  Jesus made his analogies stronger to emphasize his points.  He needs us to understand.

This whole conversation of the bread of life took place in a synagogue where Jesus was speaking no doubt on a Sabbath.

BSF Study Questions John Lesson 10, Day 3: John 6:43-51

Summary of passage:  Jesus chastises the Jews for complaining and quotes Isaiah.  He further explains how he is the bread of life that will lead to eternal life and again references Moses and the Exodus.  All it takes is listening to God and belief in him.

Questions:

5)  Those who hear the Scriptures (the word of God) will come to Jesus and be saved.  They testify about Jesus.  They are spirit and life.

6)  Only Jesus has seen God.  But in a way if you’ve seen Jesus (those walking around in 1st century Israel and saw Jesus) has seen God since God is in Jesus as the Holy Trinity.  If you are a believer, you have the Holy Spirit within (God and Jesus) as a guiding light.  He is always with us, strengthening us, guiding us, and doing His will.

7a)  Physical death and spiritual death.

b)  Part personal Question.  My answer:  If you believe in Jesus, you will not suffer spiritual death but have everlasting life.  My response is eternal gratitude.

Conclusions:  Take away:  Jesus is the only way to eternal life.  God will lead you to him.

End Notes:  Jesus here is teaching the Jews that all who come to him are drawn by God.  Remember the Jews at this time thought eternal life was a birthright.  It all starts with God.  We don’t come to Him.  He calls us and we respond.  The Greek word “draw” is the sense of alluring.

All those who belong to God are taught by God.  All those who listen to God will come to Jesus.

Jesus again insists upon his unique relationship with the Father, being the only one to have seen Him.

No other prophet ever made such a bold claim:  believe in me and have everlasting life.  This was shocking to the people at the time.  Believe meant to trust, rely on, cling to, and love.

Another famous “I am” statement:  I am the bread of life.  Bread is necessary for physical life.  Jesus is necessary for spiritual life.

We all feed upon something:  business, pleasure, entertainment, etc.  What do you feed upon?

The metaphor of eating and drinking was common in the Jesus’ time but is so universal everyone can relate.

This is not communion here.  Jesus is the bread.  Eat of him.

Jesus says he as the bread is his flesh that he willingly gives for our life.  He is alluding to his final work on the cross.

Flesh is a strong word here meant to grab attention.  Giving of flesh is death.