BSF Study Questions Romans Lesson 22, Day 3: Romans 12:4-5

Summary of passage:  All Christians form the body of Christ, acting as a whole with different functions.

Questions:

7)  Part personal Question.  My answer:  The human body.  The body works together for one goal, which is the health and function of the human body.  So are Christians. We all have different functions in the body, working together for Christ.

8 )  Each member depends on the other member to function properly and efficiently.  Each member has its own unique skills, designs, and qualifications to contribute to the smooth functioning of the body.

Conclusions:  Inherently self-explanatory passage.

End Notes:  The church is a unified whole with distinct members.  In the body of Christ there is unity but not uniformity (unity within diversity).  There is a delicate balance between unity and individuality.  Both co-exist but not at the expense of the other.  Christ is our common ground.

Advertisements

BSF Study Questions Romans Lesson 22, Day 2: Romans 12:3

Summary of passage:  Don’t be high and mighty and prideful.  Remember it is only in God’s grace that we are saved.

Questions:

3)  The grace given him by God.  So his audience knows he speaks with authority and his words are from God, not himself.  Hence, we should take him seriously.

4)  “Do not think of yourself more highly than you ought.”  We become prideful.  Think all we accomplish is because of how great we are when it’s because of how great God is.

5)  Being humble is a work in progress.  Small steps count.  Don’t judge yourself too harshly as you work to overcome human nature.  Same with others.  They are a work in progress as well and are at different places in their walk with God.  Grant others grace as they work towards overcoming pride.  Forgive them.  Encourage them in their walk as you yourself need encouragement as well.

6)  Part personal Question.  My answer:  So you don’t think you’re better than others when we’re all the same.  Always approach others with grace and forgiveness.  Like Jesus would do.  Be slow to anger and slow to react and quick to forgive and quick to encourage.

Conclusions:  Good emphasis on relating to others.  It’s so hard to approach others as Jesus would without man’s human nature of judging to interfere.  Small steps will get you there!  Same with seeing ourselves as we truly are not as some fluffed up image we carry in our mind.

End Notes:  Paul will soon speak in Verse 4 about how we should exercise spiritual gifts in the body of Christ, but a warning about humility is in order, given the inordinate pride that often arises from those who regard themselves as spiritually gifted.  Just being spiritually gifted does not equate to spiritual maturity.

Paul urges us to see the truth of ourselves and live in the light of it.  If we do, it will be impossible to live a prideful life.  We should see ourselves in light of God’s gift of saving faith with no basis for ourselves being superior.

BSF Study Questions Romans Lesson 21, Day 3: Romans 12:1

Summary of passage:  Paul urges Christians to offer our bodies as living sacrifices to God as an act of worship.

Questions:

6)  Personal Question.  My answers:

Romans 9:15:  This is the verse God says He will have mercy and compassion on whom He chooses. This shows us we are all in God’s grace to be chosen as believers and God is the one in control of whom He chooses and He doesn’t.

Romans 9:23:  God chose all of those who comes to Him in advance.  He showed his wrath and power in order to demonstrate his glory to those of us whom He shows mercy to.

Ephesians 2:4-5:  God gives us His mercy when He sent His Son, Jesus, to die for our sins to make us alive again.

1 Peter 1:3:  Similar to Ephesians, God demonstrates His mercy when though the living hope in His Son Jesus whom He brought back to life in order that we can live with Him forever.

7)  Personal Question.  My answer:  First, by choosing me and my family to be believers and to be saved.  Second, by blessing the US with all of its riches so that we live an easy life. By continuing to bless my family financially, spiritually, mentally, physically, etc every day of every year.  By always being there.

8 )  According to Webster’s Dictionary, a sacrifice is “an act of offering to deity something precious; especially the killing of a victim on an altar, destruction or surrender of something for the sake of something else or to suffer loss of, give up , renounce, injure, or destroy especially for an ideal, belief or end”.  According to Zondervan’s Illustrated Bible Dictionary, a sacrifice is “a religious act belonging to worship in which offering is made to God of some material object belonging to the offerer–this offering being consumed in the ceremony, in order to attain, restore, maintain, or celebrate friendly relations with the deity.”

The history of sacrifice in the Old Testament would fill a book.  Sacrifices have been around since Cain and Abel in Genesis 4:4-5 where it states Abel offered an acceptable sacrifice to God.  Furthermore, we’d need another book to dive into the different types of sacrifices offered in the Old Testament to God for many purposes.  BSF is sending us to Leviticus which is the Day of Atonement sacrifice where the High Priest had to cover himself  and the Israelites (figuratively here) with the blood of an animal in order to approach God and cleanse themselves of sin.  Hebrews tells us Jesus is the final sacrifice that takes away all of our sins in God’s eyes and cleanses us.

To answer the question, the Old Testament sacrifices served one goal:  to make ourselves acceptable and pleasing to God through honoring Him, worshipping Him, and giving Him glory.  We had to atone for our sins in various ways and thank Him for all He’d done.  Paul is urging us to give our bodies as a living sacrifice (our body being our heart, mind, soul, body, and spirit–all of us) to God.  To live our lives for God in every way.  To let His will reign, not ours.

9)  Ordinary is living each day with Him in mind and as the center.  Choosing Him in the little things in life:  forgiving a wrong, helping the poor and downtrodden, letting kind words out instead of angry words, being generous and compassionate with people, and meeting them where they are at.  Extraordinary examples are Mother Theresa, pastors, Popes, monks, nuns, those who work in the Christian industries such as non-profits, book publishing, bible publishing, missionaries, Focus on the Family, and everyone else I am forgetting who strive to do God’s work here on earth (this includes us whose names will never be known but who do God’s work every day!).

Conclusions:  Mercy and living for God.  Great topics that are huge and BSF did a good job on focusing on the importance of it all.  1)  God chose us out of His mercy.  2)  We do God’s work by giving all of ourselves up to Him.  Every day.  In the daily grind at work and at home.  Living for Him.  Raising our kids for Him.  Helping others for Him.  Love it!

End Notes: [Same as Yesterday’s just for Verse 1 only]  Chapters 12:1-15:33.  Paul now turns to the practical application of all he has said previously in the letter.  This does not mean he has not said anything about Christian living up to this point because as we saw Chapters 6-8 touched on this already but now Paul goes into detail to show that Jesus Christ is to be Lord of every area of life.  These chapters are not a postscript to the great theological discussions in Chapters 1-11.  In a real sense the entire letter has been directed toward the goal of showing that God demands our action as well as our believer and thinking. Faith expresses itself in obedience.

“Therefore”  It is Paul’s pattern to begin a letter with a strong doctrinal section and follow with exhortations to Christian living. Paul begs Christians to live a certain way in light of what God did for them.  Here, God gives us all things.  Now, how do we show Him gratitude for that?  With our bodies and our minds.

“Urging us” reminds us that we still have a choice in how we live for God.

“In view of God’s mercy” reminds us we do this because of the mercy God grants us (Romans 1-11).  In fact, we are only able to offer ourselves to Him because of His mercy.  Some of the mercies Paul has told us about already:

· Justification from the guilt and penalty of sin

· Adoption in Jesus and identification with Christ

· Placed under grace, not law

· Giving the Holy Spirit to live within

· Promise of help in all affliction

· Assurance of a standing in God’s election

· Confidence of coming glory

· Confidence of no separation from the love of God

· Confidence in God’s continued faithfulness

Think of “body” here as your entire being for your heart, soul, spirit, and mind are in your body. Paul is saying here give God your entire self.  God wants you!

Many today let their body rule in terms of engaging in physical pleasures.  Paul says no!  Our mind is the will and our mind brings the body as servant to God.

Ancient Greeks dismissed the body as unspiritual so this teaching would have shocked them.  Paul says God is concerned about our bodies, which were dearly bought at a price (1 Cor 6:19-20).

A living sacrifice is a dichotomy especially in the first century AD where sacrifices involved death.  The whole idea is the sacrifice is ongoing.  Paul could be contrasting dead animal sacrifices here as well or perhaps “living” in the sense of having the Holy Spirit.

“Holy and pleasing to God”:  The standard for sacrifices made to God under the New Covenant are not any less than the standard under the Old Covenant.

Sacrifices in the Old Testament:

· He shall bring a male without blemish (Leviticus 1:10)

· But if there is a defect in it, if it is lame or blind or has any serious defect, you shall not sacrifice it to the Lord your God (Deuteronomy 15:21)

The idea of a sweet aroma to the Lord is almost always linked to the idea of an offering made by fire. There is a “burning” in this matter of a living sacrifice. It also shows that Paul has in mind the burnt offering, in which the entire sacrifice was given to the Lord. In some sacrifices, the one offering the sacrifice and the priest shared in the some of the meal, but never in the burnt offering.

Today, the holiness we bring to the altar is a decision for holiness, and yielding to the work of holiness in our life.  As we present our bodies a living sacrifice, God makes our life holy by burning away impurities.

“Spiritual act of worship”:  This was translated as “reasonable service”.  The ancient Greek word for reasonable (logikos) can also be translated “of the word” (as it is in 1 Peter 2:2). Reasonable service is a life of worship according to God’s Word.

Another translation says “true and proper worship”.  This is to emphasize not merely ritual worship activity but the involvement of heart, mind, and will in worship and obedient service.

BSF Study Questions Romans Lesson 20, Day 5: Romans 11:35-36

Summary of passage:  God has given all things to us and we can never repay Him.  No one has ever given God anything.  He needs nothing.  He’s God!

Questions:

12)  Part personal Question.  My answer:  Everything.  This planet.  All we need to survive on this planet.  A capacity to survive (our minds).  Everything on this planet.  Rule over this planet and the plants and animals created.  Everything is from Him.  Life and breath.  Our place in time.  God has given us his son to die for us so that we’ll have eternal life.  Respond with gratefulness, praise, humility, a heart to do His will, a desire to not waste my life on earthly pursuits but on heavenly treasures.  The greatest response is to do His will.  Keep Him at the center of all you do and you’ll succeed.

13)  Nothing.  All He asks is our praise of Him.

14)  This thought creeps in when you live a life of entitlement.  When you think people or even God owes you for something.  This life is a gift and treat it as such.  No one owes you anything.  God gave us life.  He owes us nothing.  It is us who owe him everything.

15)  We were created (along with this universe) to praise Him.  To live for Him.  To give Him the glory.  As the creator of the universe, God is the only one who can give us anything.

16)  For His glory, honor, and power.  God’s ultimate plan is for man to be redeemed and inhabit the earth with Jesus at the End Times–to spend all of eternity worshipping Him–through the blood of His Son.

Conclusions:  Another good lesson on how we are God’s and how we only exist through Him.  Hence, He deserves all of our praise and exaltation.  Imagine our daily lives if we remembered our existence is only because of Him.  How this would change the world!

End Notes: [Same as Yesterday’s]

Paul is reflecting upon God’s overarching plan for the ages and all of mankind.  Paul realizes and states here how God’s ways are beyond men and we have no hope of figuring out His plan for the future.  God’s wisdom and knowledge are beyond him.

The quotations from Isaiah 40:13 and Job 41:11 emphasize both God’s wisdom and sovereign conduct; no one can make God their debtor.

You’ll never be able to repay God for all He’s done for you.  His is a debt only Jesus can clear.

The plan is God’s.  Only He can accomplish this plan.  All for God’s glory, honor, and pleasure.

The fact that Paul can’t figure out God makes him glorify God all the more. When we understand some of the greatness of God, we worship Him all the more passionately.

Conclusions to Lesson 20:  This is the BSF I know and love.  Great study, questions, and reflection on some powerful verses in the Bible.  We got to study the fundamentals of the Bible (why we were created) and our role in the world.  A lesson we all need every few months to remind us we deserve nothing, God owes us nothing, and everything is from Him and through Him and to Him.  Keep it up, BSF!

BSF Study Questions Romans Lesson 20, Day 2: Romans 11:33-36

Summary of passage:  This doxology that ends this section of Romans is the natural outpouring of Paul’s praise to God, whose wisdom and knowledge brought about his great plan for the salvation of both Jews and Gentiles.

Questions:

3)  Paul is praising God due to His grace extended to the Jews who will be saved.  God has not forgotten them, His call upon them is irrevocable, and Israel as a whole will turn to God.

4)  God has offered his grace and mercy to the Gentiles because of the Israelites transgressions.  This will make Israel envious and in turn bring the elect among them to Christ.

5)  Personal Question.  My answer:  Given me a job opportunity from home where I can improve our income significantly.

Conclusions:  This whole lesson is on Paul’s Doxology (a liturgical formula of praise to God).  I’ll be curious to see where BSF goes with this.  This lesson covers the “why” behind this praise.

End Notes:  Paul is reflecting upon God’s overarching plan for the ages and all of mankind.  Paul realizes and states here how God’s ways are beyond men and we have no hope of figuring out His plan for the future.  God’s wisdom and knowledge are beyond him.

The quotations from Isaiah 40:13 and Job 41:11 emphasize both God’s wisdom and sovereign conduct; no one can make God their debtor.

You’ll never be able to repay God for all He’s done for you.  His is a debt only Jesus can clear.

The plan is God’s.  Only He can accomplish this plan.  All for God’s glory, honor, and pleasure.

The fact that Paul can’t figure out God makes him glorify God all the more. When we understand some of the greatness of God, we worship Him all the more passionately.

BSF Study Questions Romans Lesson 19, Day 5: Romans 11:25-32

Summary of passage:  God’s plan is to harden the hearts of the Jews until the full number of Gentiles has come in and then all of Israel will be saved.  Israel has become disobedient so that God may show them mercy like He has done the Gentiles.

Questions:

11)  All of Israel could mean that literally:  all people of ethnic, Jewish descent or it could mean all of Israel that God has chosen to be saved by faith in Jesus (the elect).  I think all of the elect because we know faith is a choice.  Man must choose God.  And not all will choose Him (even His chosen people).

12)  They will be saved.  We can be sure because God says so through Isaiah.  God will once again turn His attention to the Jews.

13)  Part personal Question.  My answer:  God has reasons behind all His actions.  He loves all His people and wants as many as will turn to Him to come.  God works through all for His purposes.  I am comforted because I know God’s ways are not mine and everything has a purpose for Him.

14)  He showed mercy by allowing them to be disobedient and then forgiving them and offering them salvation.  We all need mercy because we are all sinners and deserve death.  Instead, God offers us eternal life through His Son, Jesus Christ.  Without mercy, heaven would be empty.

Conclusions:  This is the first time I have read all of Israel will be saved at the End Times and I was hoping to dive into this truth more.  I love gaining insight into God and His ways and seeing how He won’t leave any behind is awesome!  God never gives up on you, on me, on the people of Israel, on anyone.  Just imagine what a world this would be if all of us embraced that truth!

End Notes:  The mystery religions of Paul’s day used the Greek word (mysterion) in the sense of something that was to be revealed only to the initiated.  Paul uses this word to refer to something formerly hidden or obscure but now revealed by God for all to know and understand.  This word is used of the incarnation, the death of Christ, God’s purpose to sum up all things in Christ and especially to include both Jews and Gentiles in the NT church, the change that will take place at the resurrection and the plan of God by which both Jew and Gentile will be included in his kingdom.

Paul continues from Romans 11:11-24 by saying Israel is blind for the sake of the elect Gentiles.  God’s attention is temporarily off the Jews until He is finished with the Gentiles.  However, He will come back to His people.  The hardening is partial and temporary.

“All of Israel” does not mean every last person of Jewish descent.  It means Israel as a nation.  And they will be saved the same way the Gentiles are saved:  by faith in Jesus.  There is no special or other way for the Jews.  Salvation is not universal.  All must choose God.

Jesus will not return again until God turns the focus of His saving mercies on Israel again, and Israel responds to God through Jesus Christ (Matthew 23:39Zechariah 12:10-11).  Isaiah confirms this truth.

The Jewish people will always be loved by God for the sake of the patriarchs.  God has not given up on them (or us) as His calling endures.

Paul reminds all of us we are lawbreakers and all of us have received mercy from God.  None of us are better than another.

BSF Study Questions Romans Lesson 19, Day 4: Romans 11:11-24

Summary of passage:  Salvation has come to the Gentiles to make Israel jealous.  Israel can still be saved.  Israel’s unbelief has paved the way for the Gentiles.  However, Israel can still come to faith and the Gentiles must not boast over their salvation because they too can still fall.  Therefore, be kind for God can still cut off the Gentiles.

Questions:

8 )  Paul says because the Israelites have stumbled in their belief that Jesus is the Messiah, God has granted this opportunity to come to Him to the Gentiles in the hopes it will make Israel jealous and more Israelites will come to faith in Christ.  The good is that now all have been invited to sit at the hand of God through His Son, Jesus.  Before, only the Jews were chosen to receive God’s Word.  Now all may come.

9)  Paul is warning the Gentiles to not boast over their inclusion in God’s plan and over their faith and the Jews’ unbelief for God (being God) can cut off the Gentiles like He did the Jews.  In essence, Paul is warning don’t boast and instead be grateful and humble over your inclusion.

10)  Personal Question.  My answer:  Kindness is all of my blessings.  Sternness is when my blessings are taken from me temporary in order to grow, which in the end is a kindness as well.  The results are I have grown as a person and become more Christ-like and less me-like as I realize all things are from God.  It is all about Him.  I am more grateful than ever.

Conclusions:  It’s taken me up to this lesson to realize every day now has a personal question.  Love the grafting analogy and it would have been crystal-clear to the farmers of first century AD.  They would immediately have understood Paul’s point of bringing in the Gentiles at the expense and support of the Jews.

End Notes:  Israel stumbled, but did not fall.  They are still in God’s plan!  The Gospel only went out to the Gentiles after the Jews rejected it (Acts 13:4618:5-628:25-28).  Israel’s stumble was riches for the Gentiles for it gave them more opportunity to hear the Gospel.  The Gentiles were supposed to show the Jews how awesome a Christian life was, make them jealous, and have more come to Christ.  Instead, throughout history, they have more often than not persecuted the Jews for their beliefs when it fact it was because of the Jews that they themselves enjoyed salvation.

Part of the dough made from the first of the harvested grain (firstfruits) was offered to the Lord (Numbers 15:17-21).  This consecrated the whole batch (the Jewish people). Not all the Jews are righteous (i.e. saved) but that God will be true to his promises concerning them.  Paul saw a future for Israel.

Roots–patriarchs

Branches–Jewish people.

The salvation of Gentile Christians is dependent on the Jews.

Some commentators see the firstfruits as the first Christians, who were Jewish. Their conversion was something holy and good for the church. After all, each of the apostles and most of the human authors of Scripture were Jewish. If the conversion of this firstfruit was good for the Gentiles, how much better will it be when the complete harvest is brought in!  However, many commentators take the firstfruit here as the patriarchs.

Botanists and orchard growers commonly use grafting to improve their stock of flowers and fruit.  Usually they graft a weaker, cultivated branch onto a wild but sturdy root stock.  Paul admits that, contrary to nature, God has grafted the wild branches (Gentiles) onto the cultivated roots (Jews)–a reverse technique sometimes used to reinvigorate an olive tree.

It is only by God’s grace that they can be grafted into the “tree” of God – the “root” of which is Israel.

Paul reminds the Gentiles that the root supports the branches – not the other way around.  Any Gentile standing in the “tree” of God is there by faith only, not by works or merits. If Gentiles are unbelieving, they will be “cut off” just as much as unbelieving Israel was.

Any adequate doctrine of God must include both kindness and sternness.  When we ignore his kindness, God seems a ruthless tyrant.  When we ignore his sternness, God seems a doting father.

We must continually abide in God’s goodness (also expressed in John 15:1-8.)  Paul warns of pride.  The Jews are not cut off permanently. There is hope for all.